Archive

Monthly Archives: October 2012

Saturday, playing from 11am to 2pm with all three.

Ich habe mir gestern zwei Batterien von euch geliehen. Meine Batterien waren leer.

Zuerst, zuletzt. Anfang, Ende.

Wir fangen an.

Was hat sie? — Sie hat drei Stifte, einen roten, einen schwarzen und einen blauen. — Sie ist ein Laden.

Was habe ich? — Du hast viel Geld. — Ich bin die Bank.

Willst du einen Stift kaufen? — Ja, ich will einen Stift kaufen. — Welchen Stift willst du kaufen? — Ich will den blauen Stift kaufen. — Der rote Stift kostet zwei Euro; der schwarze Stift kostet fünf Euro; der blaue Stift kostet zehn Euro. Du willst den blauen Stift kaufen, aber der blaue Stift ist teuer.

Der rote Stift ist der billigste Stift, der blaue Stift ist der teuerste Stift. Der schwarze Stift ist teurer als der rote Stift, aber billiger als der blaue Stift.

Willst du den blauen Stift kaufen? — Ja, ich will den blauen Stift kaufen. — Hast du genug Geld? — Nein, ich habe kein Geld.

Willst du dir Geld leihen? — Ja, ich will mir Geld leihen. — Wieviel Geld willst du dir leihen? — Ich will mir zehn Euro leihen. — Ok, ich leihe dir zehn Euro.

Jetzt habe ich zehn Euro, und ich kaufe jetzt ihren Stift.

Habe ich dir zehn Euro geschenkt? — Nein, du hast mir die zehn Euro nicht geschenkt, sondern geliehen.

Der Unterschied zwischen dem Stift und dem Stift ist: der Stift ist rot, der Stift ist schwarz.

Der Unterschied zwischen der Hand und der Hand ist: die Hand ist links, die Hand ist rechts.

Der Unterschied zwischen “leihen” und “schenken” ist: wenn du Geld leihst, musst du es zurückgeben.

F, willst du einen Stift kaufen? — Ich will den roten Stift kaufen. Wieviel kostet der rote Stift? — Der rote Stift kostet zwei Euro. — Ist das billig oder teuer? — Das ist billig. — Das ist mein billigster Stift.

Hast du genug Geld? — Nein, ich habe kein Geld. — Willst du dir zwei Euro leihen? — Ja, ich will mir zwei Euro leihen.

It turns out that this lending game is too slow for F, who is getting frustrated with it, and stops cooperating after a while. For the rest of the session I feel that I have kind of lost control of the flow, making this by far the most exhausting session so far.

Wieviel Geld habe ich dir geliehen? — Du hast mir zwei Euro geliehen.

Gibst du mir bitte meine zehn Euro zurück? — Sie hat meine zehn Euro! — Gibst du mir meine zehn Euro zurück? — Nein, ich gebe dir nicht dein Geld zurück, das ist jetzt mein Geld.

M: Willst du meinen blauen Stift zurück, und du gibst mir deine zehn Euro? — Ich nehme deinen blauen Stift zurück, und gebe dir fünf Euro.

F starts stealing money from the store. The setup gets confusing.

Du kannst mir meine zehn Euro nicht zurückgeben. — Warum nicht? — Du hast keine zehn Euro. Darum nehme ich jetzt deinen blauen Stift. Du musst mir immer noch fünf Euro geben.

Wieviel Euro hast du dir geliehen?

I realize that too often I’m the only one talking. I very rarely get all three to say everything that is being said. I also feel that I’m steering the game too much, always dictating them via signs what to say. It would be much more motivating for them to have the game set up so well that they themselves most of the time know what to say, with only an occasional hint needed.

Wenn ich rede, dann lernt ihr nicht. Ihr müsst reden, sonst lernt ihr nicht. Ich kann schon Deutsch! :)

Willst du meinen roten Stift kaufen? — Ja, ich will deinen Stift kaufen, für einen Euro. — Du musst mir zwei Euro geben! — Warum muss ich dir zwei Euro geben? — Weil ich ihn für zwei Euro gekauft habe. … Ich will fünf Euro! — Wenn du fünf Euro willst, dann frag jemand anderen!

F, ich will meine zwei Euro zurück!

M: Ich muss dir noch einen Euro geben. — Das stimmt nicht! Du lügst! Du musst mir noch fünf Euro zurückgeben!

F, wieviel Euro musst du mir noch zurückgeben? — Ich muss dir noch einen Euro zurückgeben. — Das stimmt! Das ist wahr. Sie lügt nicht.

Die Wahrheit ist das Gegenteil von Lüge.

Wer sagt die Wahrheit?

Was ist passiert? — Du hast ihr zehn Euro geliehen, und sie hat den blauen Stift für zehn Euro gekauft. Aber du hast gesagt, du willst zehn Euro zurück, und sie hat keine zehn Euro. Sie hat einen blauen Stift. Du hast den blauen Stift genommen und willst noch fünf Euro.

The permanent talk in Greek that is pretty strong today is finally getting on my nerves :)

Bitte kein Griechisch!

Liste: richtig, falsch.

Das war falsch. Sie muss nicht einen Euro zurückgeben, sondern fünf.

Was kostet der schwarze Stift? — Der schwarze Stift kostet fünf Euro. — Willst du den schwarzen Stift kaufen? — Ja, ich will den schwarzen Stift kaufen, aber ich habe keine Geld.

I think the game was mostly too confusing because there are two girls lending money and then buying, and then having to give back the money. Too much concentration has to be spent on keeping everything in mind. Maybe it would be better to make shorter transactions with only one person, then the next, or something like that.

Pass auf!

Ich gebe dir jetzt zehn Euro zurück. — Danke!

F has brought her mother (aka “der Laden”) a glass of water, and has now thought of a way to get the five Euro from her :)

Ich habe dir ein Glas Wasser gegeben. Das Glas Wasser kostet fünf Euro!

Ok, enough of this game…

Wer hat die meisten Stifte? — Sie hat die meisten Stifte.

Wer hat die wenigsten Stifte? — Ich habe die wenigsten Stifte.

Wer hat das meiste Geld? Wer ist am reichsten? — Du hast das meiste Geld. Du bist am reichsten.

Wer hat das wenigste Geld? Wer ist am ärmsten? — Sie hat das wenigste Geld. Sie ist am ärmsten.

Warum ist sie am ärmsten? — Sie hat nur einen Euro. Du hast zwei Euro und einen Stift.

Versteht ihr noch “schummeln“? — V: Ich weiß nicht, was “schummeln” ist.

Ein Beispiel für “schummeln”.

I do the trick again of putting a black rock under the cup, then sneakily exchanging it.

Ist der Stein im Becher schwarz oder weiß? — Der Stein ist schwarz. — Nein, der Stein ist weiß! Ich zeige es dir!

Schummeln ist ähnlich wie lügen.

Liste: gewinnen, verlieren, unentschieden.

Nobody can think of the respective signs any more for some seconds, then the girls come up with the signs from yesterday, shouting “gewinnen! verlieren!”

Ah, ich erinnere mich, danke!

Demonstrating rock/paper/scissors to V, who was not present yesterday.

Sie hat gewonnen, ich habe verloren.

Es ist unentschieden.

In welcher Hand ist der schwarze Stein?

Finding out that hiding the hands behind the back is not helping with doing signs :P

Der schwarze Stein ist in deiner linken Hand. — Ich sage, dass der Stein in deiner rechten Hand ist.

Wer hat gewonnen, und wer hat verloren? — Ich habe verloren, und sie hat gewonnen.

Du hast fünf Euro gewonnen! — Jaa!!

We still don’t have another cup, V brings a blue bowl.

Das ist eine blaue Schüssel. Das ist kein Teller. Ein Teller ist flach, eine Schüssel ist tief.

Ich verstecke den weißen Stein, und ihr müsst raten, wo er ist. Nicht berühren!

Wer ist zuerst dran? — Der weiße Stein ist unter der blauen Schüssel. — Der weiße Stein ist unter dem orangenen Becher. — Du hast wieder gewonnen! Du kriegst zwei Euro.

Wo ist der weiße Stein? — Der weiße Stein ist … — Wer hat gewonnen? — Jetzt habe ich gewonnen. — Du hast vier Euro gewonnen. — Danke! — Gern geschehen!

Wie oft hast du gewonnen? — Ich habe zweimal gewonnen. — Wie oft hat sie gewonnen? — Sie hat nur einmal gewonnen.

Wer hat öfter gewonnen? — Sie hat öfter gewonnen als ich.

Was ist passiert? — Du hast den weißen Stein unter dem orangenen versteckt, und jetzt hast du den weißen Stein unter der blauen Schüssel versteckt.

Du sagst, ich habe geschummelt?! Habe ich geschummelt? — Nein, du hast nicht geschummelt! (because she won due to me cheating :) — M, sie sagt, dass ich nicht nicht geschummelt habe!

Ich frage jeden von euch: Habe ich geschummelt? — Nein, du hast nicht geschummelt! — Nein, du hast geschummelt! — Ja, du hast geschummelt. — Du lügst! :) Alle anderen sagen, dass ich nicht geschummelt habe! Nur du sagst, dass ich geschummelt habe!

V: Wer sagt die Wahrheit? — M: Ich sage die Wahrheit. Alle anderen lügen! Nur ich sage die Wahrheit. — Ich weiß, dass du die Wahrheit sagst, aber ich will das Geld! Entschuldigung!

Now I again have a plastic cup and a earthenware bowl. I put the rock under the bowl und move both swiftly, so that everybody can hear the rock under the bowl.

Sie fängt an! — F: Der weiße Stein ist unter der blauen Schüssel. — M: Nein, der weiße Stein ist unter dem orangenen Becher! — Der weiße Stein ist unter der blauen Schüssel! Woher weißt du das? — Ich habe es gehört! — Hast du es nicht gehört? — Beide haben es gehört, aber sie hat zuerst geraten. — M, Pech gehabt! :)

Warum hast du Glück gehabt? — Ich habe Glück gehabt, weil ich zuerst dran war.

Warum hast du Pech gehabt? — Ich habe Pech gehabt, weil ich nach ihr dran war.

Wer hat Pech gehabt? — Sie hat Pech gehabt. — Warum …? — Weil sie zuletzt dran war.

Wer war zuerst dran? — Sie war zuerst dran.

Wer war zuletzt dran? — Ich war zuletzt dran.

Jetzt andersrum!

Wo ist der weiße Stein? Sie ist zuerst dran. — Der weiße Stein ist unter der blauen Schüssel. — Nein, der weiße Stein ist unter dem orangenen Becher. — Sie hat wieder gewonnen! Warum hat sie gewonnen? — Sie hat gewonnen, weil sie gesehen hat, wo der weiße Stein ist.

V ist jetzt der Chef! (meaning that she leads the guessing game)

Wo ist der weiße Stein? — Der weiße Stein ist unter der blauen Schüssel. — Ich rate, dass der weiße Stein unter dem orangenen Becher ist.

M ist jetzt der Chef!

M, hast du gesehen wo der weiße Stein ist? Nein? Ok, F, wenn ich gewinne, dann gebe ich dir fünf Euro! — Ok! — Der weiße Stein ist unter (F sneakily points to the bowl) der blauen Schüssel. Ich glaube, der weiße Stein ist unter der blauen Schüssel. — Dann rate ich, dass der weiße Stein unter dem orangenen Becher ist. — Du hast gewonnen, weil du Glück gehabt hast! — Du hast gewonnen, weil F dir geholfen hat! — Das stimmt nicht, du lügst! Ich habe nur Glück gehabt! Sie hat mir nicht geholfen!

Haben wir geschummelt? — Nein, wir haben nicht geschummelt. Du hast nur Glück gehabt.

F: Was bedeutet “Glück”? — V: Ich weiß nicht die Zahlen für Lotto. Wenn ich Lotto spiele und ich habe gewonnen, das ist Glück.

V draws a three-leaf clover as an example for “Glück”. She says in Greece the three-leaf version is also symbolic for good luck.

Wenn in Griechenland dreiblättrige Kleeblätter Glück bringen, warum ist Griechenland dann pleite? :) Das verstehe ich nicht!

Das ist ein Beispiel für Aberglaube. Im Aberglauben bringt eine schwarze Katze zum Beispiel Pech.

M ist jetzt der Chef.

Wir haben gestern “schon” und “noch nicht” gelernt.

Erinnert ihr euch, was wir gestern mit “schon” und “noch nicht” gemacht haben?

Ein Beispiel: Ich habe schon gefrühstückt.

Liste: Frühstück, Mittagessen, Abendessen.

Hast du schon zu Mittag gegessen? — Nein ich habe noch nicht zu Mittag gegessen.

Nimm den Stift. Noch nicht! — Hast du schon den Stift genommen? — Nein, ich habe den Stift noch nicht genommen. (now she takes the pen) — Hast du den Stift schon genommen? — Ja, ich habe den Stift schon genommen.

Hast du “darum” schon gelernt? — Ja, ich habe “darum” schon gelernt.

Hast du “Überschallflieger” schon gelernt? — Nein, ich habe “Übexxx” noch nicht gelernt.

Sie ist jetzt der Chef.

Wer ist zuerst dran? — Ok, du fängst an.

Der weiße Stein ist unter der blauen Schüssel. etc.

Ich glaube, der weiße Stein ist unter der blauen Schüssel.

Jetzt andersrum. Grade war die Reihenfolge so rum, jetzt andersrum.

Ich glaube, dass der weiße Stein unter der grauen Tasse ist.

I have cheated again, looking below my sleeping mask.

Ich rate, dass der weiße Stein unter dem orangenen Becher ist.

Du hast geschummelt? — Ich schummele nie, ich habe nur Glück! — Er hat nur Glück gehabt!

Immer ist das Gegenteil von nie.

Beispiel: Ich trinke hier immer Kaffee. Sie trinken nie Kaffee.

Nachts scheint die Sonne nie.

Wir spielen immer hier, und nie in der Küche.

Jetzt bin ich euer Chef. Du bist zuerst dran.

Ich glaube, dass der weiße Stein unter der grauen Tasse ist. etc.

Warum bist du dran? — Darum!

F as usual creates havoc…

V: F, du bist zwölf, kein Baby. — Sie ist schon zwölf? — Sie ist noch elf, aber fast zwölf.

Warum hast du verloren? — Ich habe verloren, weil ich falsch geraten habe.

Manchmal ist nicht “immer”, aber auch nicht “nie”.

Beispiel: Ich esse manchmal Schokolade, nicht immer, aber auch nicht nie. Manchmal. Heute, übermorgen, nächste Woche, aber nicht immer.

I kill a fairy.

Wichtig ist “important”. Es ist wirklich sehr wichtig, dass ihr kein Griechisch sprecht.

Hast du vergessen, was “nie” bedeutet? Weißt du ein Beispiel für “nie”?

Ich esse Schokolade, oder Brot, oder Äpfel, aber nie Bücher. Nie, nicht heute, nicht morgen, nicht übermorgen.

F insists on having “nie” translated.

Noch ein Beispiel. Der Stein fällt immer nach unten, nie nach oben. Gestern, heute, morgen, nächste Woche, er fällt immer nach unten. Er fällt nie nach oben.

Ein Beispiel für “manchmal”.

I put a pen in the vertical position, and let it fall. It sometimes falls in this direction, sometimes in the other.

Der Stift fällt nach rechts, … nach rechts, nach links, nach hinten, …

Der Stift fällt manchmal nach rechts, und manchmal nach links. Aber der Stift fällt immer nach unten!

V: Morgens trinkt ihr manchmal Milch.

F insists on having “manchmal” translated.

V: Nach der Schule esst ihr manchmal Tortellini, und manchmal essen wir Kartoffeln mit Tomaten.

Wo ist der weiße Stein? — Der weiße Stein ist unter dem orangenen Becher. — Das stimmt.

Wo …? — Der weiße … unter der blauen Schüssel. — Das stimmt.

Der weiße Stein ist manchmal unter dem orangenen Becher, und manchmal unter der blauen Schüssel.

Der schwarze Stift ist nie unter dem orangenen Becher, weil er zu groß ist.

Der weiße Stein ist nicht unter der blauen Schüssel, sondern unter dem orangenen Becher.

Der Stein ist nicht schwarz, sondern weiß.

Der Becher ist nicht grün, sondern orange.

F: Was ist “manchmal”??

V: Ich weiß es, aber ich sage es dir später.

Ist “nie” das gleiche wie “immer”? — Nein, “nie” ist nicht das gleiche wie “immer”, sondern das Gegenteil.

Manche Menschen haben lange Haare, manche Menschen haben kurze Haare. Manche Menschen haben keine Haare.

Alle Menschen haben einen Kopf. Fast alle Menschen haben zwei Hände. Aber manche Menschen haben nur eine Hand, oder keine Hand.

F, du hast es verstanden, aber du willst übersetzen!

Liste: nie, fast nie, selten, manchmal, oft, fast immer, immer.

V: Wir essen manchmal Rindfleisch. Wir essen nie Schweinefleisch.

 

Advertisements

Two days break because I was away, so Session 14 on Friday. V can’t come, so it’s just me and the two girls.

Ich habe einen kleinen grauen Stein versteckt.

F and M immediately jump to the table to search under the cup! I also have a grey cup, which is called differently in German, because I could not find another plastic cup.

Nicht berühren! Keiner berührt die Tasse oder den Becher!

Worunter ist der kleine graue Stein? Ihr müsst raten! — Ich glaube, der kleine graue Stein ist unter dem orangenen Becher. — Und was glaubst du? — Ich glaube, der kleine graue Stein ist unter der grauen Tasse.

Batteries of my recording device ran out at this moment, so we lost about 5 minutes of play. We apologize for the inconvenience :)

Die Batterien waren leer.

Ich habe zwei Steine, einen hässlichen schwarzen Stein und einen schönen weißen Stein. Ich mische die beiden.

I mix them in my hands and put one of them under the cup.

Ihr müsst wieder raten. Unter welchen glaubst du ist der schöne weiße Stein? Unter dem Becher, oder unter der Tasse? — Der schöne weiße Stein ist unter der grauen Tasse. — Sie sagt, der schöne weiße Stein ist unter der grauen Tasse. Was glaubst du? — Ich glaube, der schöne weiße Stein ist unter dem orangenen Becher.

Zuerst die Tasse? Ok. — One of them is very happy :)

Liste: werfen, fangen. Ich habe ihn geworfen, ich habe ihn gefangen.

Wer will zuerst den kleinen Stein in den Becher werfen? Ich zeige ein Beispiel.

I try to throw the rock into the cup, but fail.

Daneben! Ich habe daneben geworfen. Es ist nicht leicht!

I use the signs of “da” and “neben” for “daneben”.

Ok, du wirfst ihn zuerst. Viel Glück! … Daneben! Sie hat daneben geworfen. Hat sie getroffen oder nicht? — Sie hat nicht getroffen. — Sie hat geworfen, aber nicht getroffen. Versuch du es! — Du hast auch nicht getroffen. Niemand hat getroffen.

Liste: leicht, schwer.

Ich habe fast getroffen! Knapp daneben. Jetzt du! Hehe, daneben! :) Versteht ihr daneben? Daneben ist nicht getroffen.

Liste: auf, unter, vor, hinter, neben, zwischen, oben, …

Wer von uns hat daneben geworfen? — Du und sie haben daneben geworfen.

Und wer hat getroffen? — Nur ich habe getroffen. Alle anderen haben daneben geworfen. Ich bin die einzige, die getroffen hat.

Nächste Runde, du fängst an! … Fast getroffen, aber daneben. … Völlig daneben! Nicht fast daneben, total daneben! :) … Auch daneben, aber fast getroffen.

Wer hat getroffen? — Niemand hat getroffen, alle haben daneben geworfen.

Sollen wir es nochmal versuchen? — Ja, nochmal.

Wer fängt an? — Sie fängt an, sie ist die erste. … Wer ist jetzt dran, wer ist der nächste? — Du bist der nächste.

It’s raining, suddenly the two shout “patakissa!!”.

Das ist Serbisch!

They have two girls in class that come from Serbia, and they shouted it this morning in school when it was raining.

Es regnet. Wenn es sehr kalt ist, dann schneit es. Aber jetzt regnet es.

Meine Lehrerin sagt, nächste Woche schneit es. — In Köln? — Ja. — Kennt Ihr Bayern? Bayern ist im Süden von Deutschland. Ein Teil von Deutschland. Ich erkläre es dir.

Showing the important points of Germany on my hand as a map.

Köln, Hamburg, München. Im Norden ist Schweden, Nordpol, Norwegen… Im Süden ist Griechenland, Italien, Spanien… Im Osten ist Polen. Im Westen ist Frankreich.

Liste: Norden, Osten, Süden, Westen.

In Bayern schneit es nächste Woche wahrscheinlich. In Köln wahrscheinlich nicht.

Wer ist jetzt dran? — Ich habe getroffen! — Du warst die erste, du hast angefangen. Dann war ich dran, jetzt bist du dran. … Oh, sie hat auch getroffen, sehr gut! Wer hat jetzt getroffen? — Du und ich haben jetzt getroffen. Und wer hat daneben getroffen? Sie hat schon wieder daneben getroffen! :) M wirft immer daneben!

M is a very confident girl, so she’s playing with it greatly that she is unable to hit the cup :)

Glaubst du, dass sie jetzt auch wieder daneben wirft? Bist du jetzt dran? — Nein, du bist dran. — Ich habe geworfen. Jetzt ist sie dran.

Glaubst du, dass sie jetzt wieder daneben wirft, oder dass sie trifft? Was glaubst du, daneben oder trifft? — Ich glaube, dass sie jetzt trifft.

Was ist das? — Das ist eine Heizung. — Mein Name ist F, dein Name ist Heizung! :)

Glaubst du, dass sie jetzt trifft oder wieder daneben wirft? — Ich weiß es nicht. — Aber du kannst raten. — Ich glaube, dass sie jetzt wieder daneben wirft.

The girls want to know what “monkey” means in German, as I use the monkey arms to indicate TQ Copycat.

Du bist ein Affe.

Now they want to know what “hippo” is in German :)

Nilpferd.

This fairy was sacrificed to be able to go on with the game :)

F mentions that in English there is a saying about rain involving animals.

Auf Englisch sagt man, es regnet Katzen und Hunde.

Regnet es Katzen und Hunde? — Nein, es regnet nicht Katzen und Hunde, es regnet Wasser.

Du glaubst, dass sie wieder daneben wirft. Ich glaube, dass sie jetzt trifft. Du hast nicht getroffen, aber jetzt triffst du.

M misses again :)

Sei nicht traurig! :)

Was ist passiert? — Sie hat nicht getroffen, sie hat schon wieder daneben geworfen. Sie wirft immer daneben! Habe ich getroffen? — Ja, du hast jetzt getroffen. Hat sie auch getroffen? — Nein, sie hat jetzt nicht getroffen.

Wer ist dran? Ich glaube, du bist dran. Du bist nach mir dran. Wer ist nach dir dran? — Sie ist nach mir dran.

The girls say “drang” instead of “dran”.

Nicht “drang”, sondern “dran”.

Ein Beispiel. Ist die Tischdecke rot? Nein, die Tischdecke ist nicht rot, sondern grün.

F now has the confidence to take her time to say a complicated sentence by herself, although she is struggling a lot. How Fascinating!

F: Die Tischdecke ist rot? Nein, die Tischdecke ist nicht rot, sondern grün.

F wants to know if it’s also possible to say “Die Tischdecke ist grün, sondern …”

Gute Frage! Du kannst sagen, “Der Stein ist schwarz!” — “Nein, der Stein ist nicht schwarz, sondern weiß.” oder du kannst sagen, “Der Stein ist weiß und nicht schwarz.”

“sondern” ist ähnlich wie “aber”. Zum Beispiel: “Magst du Kaffee?” “Nein, ich mag keinen Kaffee, aber ich mag Kakao.”; “Ist der Stein schwarz?” “Nein, der Stein ist nicht schwarz, sondern weiß.”

F: “sondern” ist schneller als “und der Stein ist weiß”

Beispiel: Ist der Stein schwarz? Nein, der Stein ist nicht schwarz, der Stein ist weiß; schneller: Nein, der Stein ist nicht schwarz, sondern weiß. — Ja! — Ja, das ist schneller, kürzer.

Liste: schnell, langsam.

Liste: lang, kurz

Ist der Stein schwarz? — Nein, der Stein ist nicht schwarz, sondern weiß.

Ist der Becher blau? — Nein, der Becher ist nicht blau, sondern orange.

Ist der Stift braun? — Nein, der Stift ist nicht braun, sondern rot.

Ich schenke dir drei Stifte. — Danke! — Gern geschehen.

Hast du fünf Stifte? — Nein, ich habe nicht fünf Stifte, sondern nur drei.

Hat sie drei Stifte? — Nein, sie hat nicht drei Stifte, sondern keine.

Hast du drei Stifte? — Nein, ich habe nicht drei Stifte, sondern nur einen.

Wer hat die meisten Stifte? — Sie hat die meisten Stifte.

Hat sie die meisten Stifte? — Nein, sie hat nicht die meisten Stifte, sondern ich. Sie hat überhaupt keine Stifte! Sie hat nichts.

F: Ich schenke dir einen Stift! — Oh danke! Welchen Stift schenkst du mir? — Willst du den blauen, roten, oder schwarzen Stift? — Du kannst wählen! Wähle einen Stift!

A long Greek counting-out game ensues :P

Bitte wähl schnell einen Stift! … Ok, zu langsam! Du warst du langsam :)

(Now to the other, M): Du kannst einen Stift wählen, aber schnell! (She immediately grabs the blue one) Ich wähle den blauen Stift.

Bitte wähle einen Stift. — Ich wähle den schwarzen Stift.

F is sitting quite far away from the table.

F, komm näher. … Stop!

F, ich will ihr einen Stift schenken, aber ich weiß nicht, welchen. Bitte wähl einen für sie. — Ich wähle den roten Stift! — Soll ich ihr den roten Stift schenken? — Ja.

Was hat sie jetzt? — Sie hat jetzt zwei rote Stifte. — Und was hast du jetzt? — Ich habe jetzt nichts. Ich will meinen roten Stift! — Welcher ist dein roter Stift, der linke oder der rechte? Du weißt es nicht, du musst raten :) Du hast vergessen, welcher deiner ist. — Ich wähle den rechten. — Meinen rechten oder deinen rechten? — Deinen linken. — Hier, ich schenke ihn dir.

Willst du noch einen Stift? — Ja, ich will noch einen Stift. — Von wem willst du einen Stift nehmen, von ihr oder von mir? Du musst wählen! — Ich nehme einen Stift von dir. — Warum willst du keinen Stift von ihr nehmen? — Ich will keinen Stift von ihr nehmen, weil ihr Stift rot ist, und ich schon einen roten Stift habe.

Warum willst du nicht ihren roten Stift haben? — Weil ich schon einen roten Stift habe.

Verstehst du “schon”? Sie hat noch keinen blauen Stift. (giving her a blue pen) Jetzt hat sie einen blauen Stift.

Hast du schon Hunger? — Nein, ich habe noch keinen Hunger. Später habe ich Hunger, aber jetzt noch nicht.

Hast du schon gegessen? — Ja, ich habe schon gegessen.

Noch ein Beispiel. M, ich schenke dir meinen blauen Stift. Bitte nimm ihn. (before she can take it): Hat sie ihn schon genommen? — Nein, sie hat ihn noch nicht genommen.

Now she takes the pen.

Ich frage nochmal: Hat sie ihn schon genommen? — Ja, sie hat ihn schon genommen.

Anderes Beispiel: Ist mein Kaffee schon leer? — Nein, er ist fast leer. — Er ist noch nicht leer, er ist fast leer. — M: Mein Kakao ist leer. — F, ist ihr Kakao schon leer? — Ja, ihr Kakao ist schon leer. — Ist mein Kaffee schon leer? — Nein, dein Kaffee ist noch nicht leer.

Ich trinke jetzt meinen Kaffee. … Ist mein Kaffee schon leer? — Ja, dein Kaffee ist jetzt leer.

Willst du mir deinen roten Stift schenken? — Ja, ich gebe dir meinen roten Stift. (before she gives it to me):

Hast du mir schon deinen roten Stift gegeben? — Nein, ich habe dir meinen roten Stift noch nicht gegeben.

F, sie will mir ihren roten Stift schenken. Aber hat sie ihn mir schon gegeben? — Nein, sie hat ihn dir noch nicht gegeben.

M: Jetzt gebe ich dir meinen roten Stift.

F, willst du einen Stift von mir? — Ja, ich will einen Stift von dir. — Welchen? Du darfst wählen, aber schnell :) — Ich will deinen schwarzen Stift! — Ich gebe dir meinen schwarzen Stift.

M: Hat er dir schon seinen schwarzen Stift gegeben? — Nein, er hat mir noch nicht seinen schwarzen Stift gegeben.

Bitte gib ihn ihr! — Ok, ich gebe ihn ihr.

F: M, ich schenke dir meinen roten Stift. Und ich gebe dir [S] deinen schwarzen Stift zurück!

M: Und ich gebe dir deinen blauen Stift zurück.

Habt ihr mir schon meine Stifte zurückgegeben? — Ja, wir haben dir schon deine Stifte zurückgegeben.

I get out some money.

Wieviel Euro hast du? Zähl mal. — Ich habe zwölf Euro.

Wer hat am meisten Euro? — Ich habe am meisten Euro.

Wer hat am wenigsten Euro? — Du hast am wenigsten Euro. Du hast nur einen Euro.

Wieviel Euro hat sie? — Sie hat sechs Euro. Sie hat halb so viel Geld wie ich.

Du hast doppelt so viel Geld wie sie. Zweimal so viel.

Du hast zwölf, ich habe sechs, und er hat nur einen.

Ich habe eine Frage. Das hier ist “leihen“. Ich zeige euch ein Beispiel.

M, leihst du mir vier Euro? Du gibst mir vier Euro, und später gebe ich dir vier Euro zurück. Ich muss ihr das Geld zurückgeben.

F, leihst du mir zwei Euro? — Ja, ich schenke dir zwei Euro. — Schenken ist nicht leihen. Leihen heißt, ich muss es zurückgeben. — Ok, ich gebe dir zwei Euro. Aber ich will sie später zurückhaben. Ich leihe sie dir nur.

M, du fragst mich: Hast du ihr ihre zwei Euro schon zurückgegeben? Ist ja nur geliehen, ich muss sie zurückgeben! — Hast du ihr ihre zwei Euro schon zurückgegeben? — Nein, ich habe ihr ihre zwei Euro noch nicht zurückgegeben. Soll ich dir deine zwei jetzt zurückgeben, oder später? — Du kannst mir meine zwei Euro später zurückgeben. — Ok, ich gebe dir deine zwei Euro später zurück.

To M: Soll ich dir zwei Euro schenken? — Ja, bitte schenk mir zwei Euro. — Hier, ich schenke dir zwei Euro, bitteschön! — Ich habe jetzt vierzehn Euro.

So i just gave the two Euro that i had loaned from F to M :)

F, willst du jetzt deine zwei Euro zurückhaben? — Ja, ich will meine zwei Euro zurückhaben. — Ich habe deine zwei Euro nicht mehr. Ich habe ihr deine Euro geschenkt. — M: Ich gebe dir deine zwei Euro zurück. — S: Danke, aber das sind nicht meine zwei Euro, das sind ihre zwei Euro. — Jetzt kannst du ihr ihre zwei Euro zurückgeben. — F, willst du deine zwei Euro jetzt zurückhaben? — Ja, ich will meine zwei Euro jetzt zurückhaben. — Ok, ich gebe dir deine zwei Euro zurück.

Wer hat Pantoffeln an? — Sie hat Pantoffeln an. Sie hat keine Pantoffeln an, sie hat Socken an. Ich habe nichts an.

Doing the fingerspelling alphabet for a break.

Willst du den roten Stift verstecken? — Ja, ich will den roten Stift verstecken! — Versteck den roten Stift im Zimmer!

Weißt du, was du suchen musst? — Ja, ich weiß was ich suchen muss. — Was musst du suchen? — Ich muss einen roten Stift suchen.

Ist der rote Stift links im Zimmer? — Ja, der rote Stift ist links im Zimmer.

F is bugging M, holding her etc.

Du darst sie nicht berühren. — Warum nicht? — Weil sie dann nicht suchen kann.

Ist der rote Stift in der Lampe? — Nein, der rote Stift ist nicht in der Lampe.

Ist der rote Stift in den Schuhen? — Nein, der rote Stift ist nicht in den Schuhen.

Ist der rote Stift unter dem Wagen? — Nein, …

Ist der rote Stift unter dem Sessel? — Nein, …

Ist der rote Stift hinter dem Sessel? — Nein, …

Ist der rote Stift auf dem Sessel? — Ja, der rote Stift ist auf dem Sessel.

Sitzt du auf dem roten Stift? — Nein, ich sitze nicht auf dem roten Stift.

Ist der rote Stift hinter dem Kissen? — Nein, …

Sie hat geschummelt. Verstehst du “schummeln”? — Nein.

I put a black rock under one of two cups, the orange one to be precise.

Wo ist der schwarze Stein? — Der schwarze Stein ist unter dem orangenen Becher. — Nein, er ist unter der grauen Tasse. (while lifting the orange cup, I slipped the rock into my hand pseudo-secretly, and put it under the grey cup) Das ist “schummeln”, versteht ihr? Das ist ähnlich wie “lügen”. Lügen ist: “Ist er unter dem orangenen Becher?”; “Nein, er ist nicht unter dem orangenen Becher (while the rock stays under the orange cup)“.

Ist der rote Stift im Pantoffel? — In welchem Pantoffel, im linken oder im rechten? — Ist der rote Stift im linken Pantoffel? — Nein, … — … im rechten Pantoffel? — Nein, …

Ist der rote Stift hinter dir? — Nein, …

Wo ist der rote Stift?! (I see that F has clipped the red pen onto her shirt, and grab it) — Er war hinter dir!

M puts on the sleeping mask.

Ich bin ein Ninja! — Du bist das Gegenteil von einem Ninja!

About 90 minutes into the game, both girls are monkeying around, not focusing at all on the game.

Ich zeige nochmal das Beispiel für “schummeln” mit dem Stein.

Frag mich wie ich heiße. — Wie heißt du? — Ich heiße “Frank”. — Du lügst!

Ich frage dich etwas, und du lügst. F, wie alt bist du? — Ich bin hundert, äh ein Jahre alt. — Ah, ich dachte du bist drei Jahre alt!

Ok, ihr versteht “lügen”. Verstehst du auch “schummeln”? (TQ Prove it!) Schummeln ist zum Beispiel Lügen im Spiel.

V comes home from work.

Machst du Pause, oder willst du spielen? — Wie viele Stunden noch? — Ich weiß noch nicht, eine halbe Stunde vielleicht. — Wann morgen? — Ist morgen Freitag? — Heute ist Freitag! — Ok, morgen ist Samstag. Wann könnt ihr morgen? — Um elf Uhr. — Ok, dann um elf. An welchen Tagen kannst du nicht? Montag und Mittwoch? — Ja, Dienstag ok.

V leaves, so it’s still the three of us.

F, willst du schummeln? — Ja.

Schummeln und lügen ist ähnlich, aber nicht gleich. Ich schummle.

I have eight Euro.

Du fragst mich: Hast du acht Euro? — Nein, ich habe nicht acht Euro (swiftly remove two Euro) , ich habe nur sechs Euro. — Hast du sechs Euro? — Nein, (putting the two Euro back secretly) ich habe acht Euro. Ich bin nur am schummeln.

Wenn ich gewinnen will… versteht ihr “gewinnen”? — Nein.

“Gewonnen” ist das Gegenteil von “verloren” im Spiel. Ich gewinne, du verlierst.

I nonverbally start a game of rock-paper-scissors, which is known around the world.

Wer hat gewonnen? — Sie hat gewonnen, und wir haben verloren.

Wir spielen nochmal. … Wer hat gewonnen? — Du und ich haben gewonnen, und sie hat verloren.

Nochmal… wer hat jetzt gewonnen? — Nur sie hat gewonnen. Wir haben beide verloren.

Nochmal… — Alle haben gewonnen. — Und verloren! Wir haben alle gewonnen und verloren? — Ja! — Dann ist es unentschieden. Nicht gewonnen und nicht verloren.

Liste: gewonnen, verloren, unentschieden.

I use the V sign for “gewonnen”, the ASL sign for “lose” for “verloren”, and a hand-crafted sign with one V hand up and one down for “unentschieden”.

I start the game where two persons have to hold their hands together, and one has to hit the hand of the other.

Gewonnen! Verloren! etc.

Noch zehn Minuten? — Ja.

Jetzt habe ich einen schönen weißen und einen hässlichen schwarzen Stein. Ich tue einen davon hier rein. Einen von den beiden. Aber ich sage nicht, welchen. Ihr müsst raten.

Ich glaube, du hast den schwarzen Stein versteckt. — Und was glaubst du? — Ich glaube auch, du hast den schwarzen Stein versteckt. — Soll ich es euch zeigen? … Nein, ich habe nicht den schwarzen Stein versteckt, ich habe den weißen Stein versteckt. Ihr habt beide verloren!

Was ist passiert? — Du hast den schwarzen Stein versteckt und mit dem grauen Stein getauscht. — Ihr sagt, ich habe geschummelt? — Ja! — Ihr lügt!! Ich schummele nie!!!

Ihr versteht “immer”? “nie” ist das Gegenteil von “immer”.

Wir spielen immer hier, auf diesem Tisch. Wir spielen nie auf dem weißen Tisch. Versteht Ihr? — Ja.

Wenn es regnet, dann regnet es immer Wasser, und nie Katzen und Hunde. Es regnet nie Katzen und Hunde.

Menschen haben fast immer zwei Augen, und nie fünf Augen. Niemand hat fünf Augen.

M: Ich habe zwei Augen, und nie eins. (hmm, not sure she understood that correctly)

Ich schummele nie!! Ihr lügt!!! Ich habe nicht geschummelt.

Liste: gewonnen, verloren, unentschieden.

Ich habe einen Stein im orangenen Becher versteckt. Welchen Stein habe ich versteckt? Ihr müsst raten! — Du hast den weißen Stein versteckt! — Du glaubst, den weißen Stein? — Nein, den grauen Stein. — Ok, was sagst du? — Ich sage, du hast den weißen Stein versteckt. — Und du? — Ich sage, du hast den schwarzen Stein versteckt.

Ich frage dich [F] heimlich: (saying softly) Wieviel Geld gibst du mir, wenn du gewinnst? — Kein Geld! — Ok, dann gewinnt sie!

Wer hat gewonnen? — Sie hat gewonnen. — Und wer hat verloren? — Ich habe verloren.

Nochmal. Du sagst “schwarz”, und du sagst “weiß”. F, welche Farbe hat der Stein im Becher? — Schwarz. — Und welche Farbe sagst du? — Weiß. — Heimlich [to M]: Wieviel Geld gibst du mir, wenn du gewinnst? — Ich gebe dir zehn Euro. — Ok, gib mir zehn Euro, dann gewinnst du!

Ok, so now I teach two eleven-year-olds the basics of corruption :) I pseudo-secretly switch the black rock for the white one.

F, du hast verloren, der Stein ist weiß! — Du hast den Stein getauscht!! — Du sagst, ich habe geschummelt? Ich habe nicht geschummelt!! … F, du hast recht, ich habe geschummelt. Ich habe die Steine getauscht. Ich habe gelogen. Aber sie hat mir Geld gegeben, um zu gewinnen! Sie ist schuld! Ok :)

Sind die Batterien voll oder leer? — Die Batterien sind fast leer.

Tust du die Sachen bitte in die Tasche? Danke!

Tuesday, playing with all three from 14:30 to 17:00. Wednesday and Thursday I’m not in Cologne, but maybe we can play Thursday evening a bit. Monday was the first day after autumn break, and V tells me that she is totally amazed that after two weeks, she suddenly understands almost everything (90%) the VHS teacher says, and that it’s the same with the children in school. I’m happy :)

We slowly slip into German, and V asks me if I have her email address. I have, but wonder if I mistyped when sending her a mail

Falsch ist das Gegenteil von richtig. Vielleicht ist deine Emailadresse falsch. Vor wievielen Tagen hast du mir eine Email geschickt? — Vor zwei Tagen. — Ich habe meine Mail seit sieben Tagen nicht gecheckt. — Ich checke meine Email immer, manchmal fast alle zehn Minuten.

I get out a third rock, small and not really black. Yes, it’s not easy to get a rock in Cologne :P

F: Das ist ein kleiner grauer Stein. Der hässliche schwarze Stein ist der Vater. Der hässliche schwarze Stein hat einen kleinen hässlichen Sohn.

F: Der weiße Stein ist die Mutter. — Vielleicht! :) Der Vater ist schwarz, die Mutter weiß, und das Kind grau :)

Setup: two rocks of different size, and two sticks of different size.

Was hast du? — Ich habe einen schwarzen Stein.

Was hast du? — Ich habe einen grauen Stein.

Was hast du? — Ich habe einen Stock.

Was hast du? — Ich habe auch einen Stock.

Liste: groß, klein.

Ist dein Stein größer als ihr Stein? — Ja, mein Stein ist größer als mein Stein.

F as always tries to change the setup by herself :)

Nicht berühren!

Verstehst du “berühren”? (V was not present yesterday, when we played with this)

M, bitte berühr deinen Stock. (she touches it) — V: Ah, ok.

F, ist dein Stein größer als meiner? — Ja, mein Stein ist größer als deiner. — Nein, das stimmt nicht. Das ist falsch! Du lügst!! :) — Ok, mein Stein ist nicht größer als deiner. Mein Stein ist kleiner als deiner.

Beispiel für “lügen”: Hast du das Geld geklaut? — Nein, ich habe das Geld nicht geklaut!! Aber ich habe das Geld geklaut! Ich lüge! Das stimmt nicht!

Du fragst sie. — Ist dein Stock größer als mein Stein? — Ja, mein Stock ist größer als dein Stein. — Das stimmt.

Du fragst mich. — Ist dein Stock größer als mein Stock? — Nein, mein Stock ist nicht größer als dein Stock. Mein Stock ist kleiner als dein Stock.

When trying to compare my stick with V’s rock, we find that the stick is longer, but the rock has more volume. Not Obviously! enough!

Ist dein Stock größer als mein Stein? — Ich weiß nicht. Aber er ist länger.

Ist dein Stock länger als mein Stein? — Ja, mein Stock ist länger als dein Stein.

Welcher Stock ist länger, der linke oder der rechte? — Der linke Stock ist länger als der rechte.

Beispiele für “beide” für V: Wer ist deine Tochter, sie oder sie? — Beide sind meine Töchter.

Welchen Stock willst du, den oder den? — Ich will beide.

Welcher von beiden Stöcken ist der längere? — Der Stock ist der längere von beiden.

Welche von deinen beiden Töchtern hat graue Socken? — M hat graue Socken.

Welche von deinen beiden Töchtern hat gestreifte Socken? — F hat gestreifte Socken.

Liste: Füße, Schuhe, Pantoffeln, Socken.

The signs for these are similar, with Füße using the F hand, Schuhe the S hand, Pantoffeln the P hand, and Socken the K hand (SocKen). The girls get very interested in the sign alphabet.

Welche von deinen beiden Töchtern hat graue Socken? — Die rechte Tochter hat graue Socken.

Ich habe vergessen, wie sie heißt! — Frag sie, wie sie heißt. — Wie heißt du? — Ich heiße M. — Ah!

F: Sie heißt Lukas! — M, du bist jetzt ein Sohn, keine Tochter. Du bist Lukas!

Welche von deinen beiden Töchtern hat gestreifte Socken? — Die linke Tochter hat gestreifte Socken. Ich habe vergessen, wie du heißt.

Wer hat den längsten Stock? — Ich habe den längsten Stock. — Genau, aber ich frage sie. — Sie hat den längsten Stock. — Welche, sie oder sie? — Die rechte.

Wer hat den kleinsten Stein? Ich frage immer noch sie.

F is as usual monkeying around :)

F, was war die Frage? — Du hast sie gefragt, wer den kleinsten Stein hat — Sehr gut :)

Er hat dich gefragt, wer den kleinsten Stein hat, du, ich, sie, oder er. Wer, deine linke oder deine rechte Tochter? — Meine linke Tochter hat den kleinsten Stein.

Woraus ist der orangene Becher? — Der orangene Becher ist aus Plastik.

Liste: rein, raus.

I go out of the room, and come back in.

Rein, raus.

Ich suche ein Beispiel für “doch”.

Du bittest mich: bitte berühr deinen Stock nicht. — Bitte berühr deinen Stock nicht. — Doch, ich berühre meinen Stock! Du sagst nein, aber ich mache es doch.

Wer von euch will meinen orangenen Becher fangen? — Ich! — Ich!

V: M hat das Verb gefunden, sie… — Sie darf

Beispiel: Ich will aus dem Fenster springen. — Du darfst nicht! Ich verbiete es dir! Nein!

Was machen wir beide? — Du wirfst deinen orangenen Becher und sie fängt ihn.

Wer fängt ihn? — Sie fängt ihn.

Und wer wirft ihn? — Du wirfst ihn.

Willst du ihn werfen? — Ja, ich will ihn werfen. Ich will ihn zu ihr werfen. — Darf sie ihn werfen? — Ja, sie darf ihn werfen.

Hat sie ihn gefangen? — Ja, sie hat ihn gefangen.

Hat sie ihn geworfen? — Nein, sie hat ihn nicht geworfen. Ich habe ihn geworfen. Ich habe ihn zu ihr geworfen, und sie hat ihn gefangen.

F, willst du ihn zu ihm werfen? — Ja, ich will ihn zu ihm werfen. — Dann wirf ihn! Wenn du ihn wirfst, dann fange ich ihn

Wer hat den Becher geworfen? — Sie hat ihn geworfen.

Und wer hat ihn gefangen? — Du hast ihn gefangen.

Ich werfe jetzt den Becher zu dir.

Instead, I throw the cup to another person :)

Was ist passiert? — Du hast gesagt, dass du den Becher zu mir wirfst, aber du hast ihn zu ihr geworfen! Du hast gelogen!

Drinking my coffee, which i again have forgotten, and it’s cold :)

Ah, der Kaffee ist sehr stark! Nur Kaffee, ohne Zucker, ohne Milch ist schwarzer Kaffee. Ich möchte meinen Kaffee schwarz.

M, kannst du bitte einen Löffel bringen? — Ah ja!

M brings an apple :)

Du hast einen Apfel gebracht, aber ich wollte, dass du einen Löffel bringst :)

F is blowing air into her water with a straw.

V: F, du bist kein Baby mehr!

F, du machst Sprudel!

M, bitte bring zwei Löffel, einen kleinen und einen großen!

V: Willst du, dass wir zu Hause nur Deutsch sprechen?

Ich will, dass du aufstehst!

Liste: Sitzen, aufstehen.

Ich will, dass du dich setzt!

Ich will, dass du die Flasche hinstellst!

Ich will, dass du die Flasche nicht berührst!

M, stell dich hin! M, leg dich hin. M, ich will, dass du deinen rechten Arm hebst!

V: F, bist du ein Baby? — Nein, ich bin kein Baby! — Doch, du bist ein Baby!

Versteck bitte den großen Löffel.

Wo ist der große Löffel? — Ich weiß es nicht. — Ich weiß es. Du hast ihn genommen. — Nein, ich habe ihn nicht genommen! — Doch, du hast ihn genommen! — Doch, ich habe es gesehen! — Und ich habe es auch gesehen! — Ich weiß, wo er ist. Sie hat ihn versteckt. — Wo hat sie ihn versteckt? Ich weiß es. Soll ich es dir sagen? — Ja, bitte sag es mir.

“Soll” ist ähnlich wie “muss”. “Muss” ist stärker als “soll”. Beispiel: Du sollst nicht zuviel essen. Besser nicht! Aber, “du darfst nicht” ist das Gegenteil von “du musst”. Du darfst zu viel essen, aber dann wird dir schlecht. Du sollst nicht.

Soll ich dir sagen, wo sie den großen Löffel versteckt hat? — Ja, bitte sag es mir. — Ok, ich sage es dir. Sie hat den großen Löffel in der Tasche versteckt. — Wirklich? — Ja, wirklich. Das stimmt.

M: Das ist mein großer Löffel, nicht berühren!

Wo ist der kleine Löffel? — Ich weiß, wo der kleine Löffel ist. — Ich auch! — Ich habe gesehen, wo du den Löffel versteckt hast.

Liste: verstecken, suchen, finden.

Das ist ein Glas, das ist kein Becher. Ein Becher ist nicht aus Glas. Ein Glas ist aus Glas. Das ist eine Tasse, das ist ein Becher, das ist ein Glas.

Ich habe nicht gesehen, wo du den Löffel versteckt hast. — Wer hat gesehen, wo ich den kleinen Löffel versteckt habe? — Ich und sie haben es gesehen.

Wer hat es gesehen? — Sie und sie. Beide haben es gesehen. — Nur sie hat es nicht gesehen.

Wo ist der Löffel? Ihr habt beide geraten, aber du hast richtig geraten. Du hast falsch geraten.

F: Giraffe!!

Bitte setz dich. Ich will, dass du dich setzt. M, ich will, dass du dich auch setzt. Jetzt sitzt ihr beide.

Liste: verstehen, wissen, vergessen, raten, glauben, erinnern, lernen.

Du lernst in der Schule. Du lernst Deutsch.

V: Wir sind aus Griechenland nach Deutschland gekommen, aber wir haben kein Deutsch gelernt. Du gehst in die Schule, um Deutsch zu lernen.

Liste: schreiben, lesen.

Verstehst du “Reihenfolge“? Erster, zweiter, dritter, …

I put four objects on the table, ordered by length.

Kurz, länger, lang. Das ist die richtige Reihenfolge.

Now I switch two.

Jetzt ist die Reihenfolge falsch.

Erinnern ist das Gegenteil von vergessen.

M: Ich bin eine Schülerin.

Wo ist der kleine Löffel? — Jemand hat ihn genommen, aber ich weiß nicht, wer.

Weißt du, wer den kleinen Löffel genommen hast? — Nein, ich weiß es nicht.

Weißt du, wer es weiß? — Sie weiß, wer ihn genommen hat.

M wants to put the sleeping mask on F.

Wenn sie die Augen schließt, dann kann sie nicht mehr spielen.

F, du kannst mitspielen, oder nicht mitspielen, wie du willst. Aber wenn du mitspielst, dann musst du sitzen.

Weißt du, wo der kleine Löffel ist? — Nein, ich weiß es nicht.

M again wants to know what “es” means.

Hier keine Grammatik. Grammatik macht uns langsam.

Wer hat gesehen, wo ich den kleinen Löffel versteckt habe? — Ich glaube, sie hat es gesehen. Frag sie! — Hast du gesehen, wo er den kleinen Löffel versteckt hat? — Ja, ich habe es gesehen. Er hat den kleinen Löffel unter dem Sofa versteckt.

Wer hat den größeren Löffel, ich oder sie? — Sie hat den größeren Löffel.

F mocks her sister because of her pronunciation of “Löffel”, I tell her in English to stop it, it poisons the atmosphere.

Wer hat den schwarzen Stein? — Sie hat den schwarzen Stein.

Der schwarze Stein ist die Ausnahme.

Bitte nimm ihren schwarzen Stein, aber berühr ihn nicht.

F pushes the rock with her spoon.

Was hat sie gemacht? — Sie hat meinen schwarzen Stein mit ihrem Löffel genommen.

Ich schlage mich mit meiner Hand. Ich kratze mich mit meinen Fingern.

Bitte gib ihr ihren schwarzen Stein zurück, aber berühr ihn nicht.

Was ist passiert? — Sie hat meinen Stein mit ihrem Löffel geschoben.

Womit hat sie ihn geschoben? — Sie hat ihn mit ihrem Löffel geschoben.

Ich schiebe ihren Löffel zu dir. Womit habe ich ihn geschoben? — Du hast ihn mit deiner Hand geschoben.

Wieviele Finger habe ich? — Du hast zehn Finger.

Wieviele Finger hast du? — Ich habe auch zehn Finger.

Wieviele Finger hat sie? — Sie hat auch zehn Finger.

Wir alle haben zehn Finger. Zusammen haben wir vierzig Finger.

M wants to count the toes too.

Das sind keine Finger, das sind Zehen. Affen haben zwanzig Finger, aber wir haben zehn Finger und zehn Zehen.

Ein Zeh, zwei Zehen.

Das ist der große Zeh, das ist der kleine Zeh.

Finger am Fuß heißen “Zehen”.

Zusammen haben wir vierzig Finger und vierzig Zehen.

V is talking on the phone for the last ten minutes, so I show the girls the complete sign alphabet, starting from F for “Fuß”, etc.; it turns out that we have already seen many of the letter signs.

Liste: Glas, Metall, Stein, Holz, Plastik, Papier

For example, D appears in “der”, “darum”, E in “Euro”, F in “Fuß”, G in “grün, Griechenland, Glas”, H in “Holz”, K in “kein”, L in “links”, M in “wem”, N in “wen”, P in “Pantoffel”, R in “rechts”, S in “Schuhe, Stein”.

Was ist das? Was soll das sein?

Wohin/Woher?

Woher kommst du? — Ich komme aus Griechenland.

Das ist dein Stein. Ich schiebe deinen Stein zu ihr. Woher kommt der Stein? — Der Stein kommt von    F. — Wohin habe ich den Stein geschoben? Nach da. Von da nach da.

Liste: Wo, woher, wohin?

Wohin soll ich den schwarzen Stein schieben? — Bitte schieb den schwarzen Stein zu ihr.

Bitte schieb den schwarzen Stein zu ihr, aber mit der linken Hand.

We use ever more difficult parts of the body to move the rock, a great method to make the game more Alive!.

Bitte schieb den schwarzen Stein zu ihr, aber mit dem rechten Fuß.

Ich schiebe den schwarzen Stein zu ihr, aber mit der Nase. — Gut gemacht!

Bitte schieb den schwarzen Stein zu ihr, aber mit deinem linken großen Zeh.

V comes back after a long phone call.

Sie schiebt den schwarzen Stein zu ihr, aber nur mit dem linken großen Zeh.

Ich schiebe den schwarzen Stein zu dir, aber nur mit meinem Auge. — Gut gemacht!

V: Willst du Kinder?! — Ich weiß es noch nicht. Vielleicht. Jetzt noch nicht.

Achtung, gleich fällt der Stein runter!

Positioning the rock at the very edge of the table.

Der Stein fällt fast runter.

Wo ist der Stein? — Der Stein ist in der Hose versteckt.

Soll ich den Stein mit meinem Ellenbogen schieben? Muss ich? — Nein, du musst nicht. — Ok, aber ich mache es.

Aber zuerst trinke ich meinen Kaffee. Der Kaffee ist sehr kalt.

Mein Kaffee ist leer. Ich habe meinen Kaffee getrunken.

Was ist das? — Das ist ein Aufnahmegerät.

I whisper very softly.

Hast du mich gehört? — Nein, ich habe dich nicht gehört.

Was ist in ihrem linken Socken? — In ihrem linken Socken ist ihr linker Fuß.

Und was ist in ihrem rechten Socken? — In ihrem rechten Socken ist ihr rechter Fuß.

V: Oh, sie hat zwei Füße!! — Ja, zuviel oder? Nein, zuwenig?

Wieviele Zehen hast du? — Ich habe zehn Zehen.

Was ist in ihrem linken Pantoffel? — In ihrem linken Pantoffel ist ihre linke Socke.

Und was ist in ihrem linken Socken? — In ihrem linken Socken ist ihr linker Fuß.

Was ist unter dem weißen Stein? — Unter dem weißen Stein ist der orangene Becher.

Was ist unter dem orangenen Becher? — Unter dem orangenen Becher ist die grüne Tischdecke.

Was ist unter der grünen Tischdecke? — Unter der grünen Tischdecke ist der Glastisch.

Was ist unter dem Glastisch? — Unter dem Glastisch ist der Boden.

V: Unter dem Boden ist der Nachbar! :)

The two daughters use their long hair to put on a mustache.

Ihr habt beide einen Schnurrbart. Ihr seid doch Söhne, keine Töchter!

Wir sind Piraten!

Bitte gib mir deinen Müll. — Ich gebe dir meinen Müll für zwei Euro! Ich will meinen Müll zurück! Ok, du kannst ihn behalten. — Ich verkaufe ihn dir für fünf Euro. — Guter Preis! Billig!

Liste: billig, teuer.

On Monday, the mother had to go to conventional German lessons at VHS, so I played with the two daughters from 6pm to 8pm.

Warum trinkst du keinen Kaffee? — Ich trinke keinen Kaffee, weil ich ihn nicht mag.

Setup: three sticks of different lenght.

Was hast du? — Ich habe einen Stock.

Was hat sie? — Sie hat auch einen Stock.

Und was habe ich? — Du hast aus einen Stock.

Wir haben alle einen Stock.

Sind alle Stöcke gleich? — Nein, die Stöcke sind nicht alle gleich.

Welcher Stock ist länger, deiner oder ihrer? — Mein Stock ist länger als deiner.

Kurz ist das Gegenteil von lang.

Das Gegenteil von klein ist groß.

Ist dein Stock der längste? — Nein, mein Stock ist nicht der längste. Mein Stock ist der kürzeste.

Kurz, kürzer, der kürzeste.

Ist dein Stock der kürzeste? — Ja, mein Stock ist der kürzeste.

Ist mein Stock länger als deiner? — Ja, dein Stock ist länger als meiner.

Ist mein Stock länger als deiner? — Nein, dein Stock ist nicht länger als meiner. Dein Stock ist kürzer als meiner. Mein Stock ist länger als deiner.

Ist dein Stock der längste? — Ja, mein Stock ist der längste.

Ich gebe dir einen Euro. Ich gebe mir zwei Euro. Ich gebe dir drei Euro.

Wer hat am meisten Geld? — Sie hat am meisten Geld.

Wer hat am wenigsten Geld? — Ich habe am wenigsten Geld.

Willst du mehr Geld? — Ja, ich will mehr Geld. — Ok, dann musst du deinen Stock verkaufen. Wenn du mehr Geld willst, dann musst du deinen Stock verkaufen.

Ich verkaufe meinen Stock. — Für wieviel verkaufst du deinen Stock? Wieviel Euro willst du? — Ich verkaufe meinen Stock für zwei Euro. — Nur zwei Euro? Das ist billig!

200 Euro sind teuer. 1 Euro ist billig. Billig ist das Gegenteil von teuer.

Willst du ihren Stock kaufen? — Ja, ich will ihren Stock kaufen? — Ok, dann kauf ihn.

Ich gebe dir meinen Stock für zwei Euro.

Wieviel Euro hast du jetzt? — Ich habe jetzt drei Euro.

Und wieviel Euro hat sie jetzt? — Sie hat jetzt nur noch einen Euro.

Ich will eine Schokolade. — Ok, ich gebe dir eine Schokolade. — Und eine Serviette. — Ok, ich gebe dir eine Serviette.

Willst du meinen Stock kaufen? — Ja, ich will deinen Stock kaufen. — Weisst du was er kostet? — Nein, wieviel kostet er? — Er kostet zehn Euro! — Nein, das ist zu teuer!

Wenig Geld: billig. Viel Geld: teuer. Der Fernseher kostet 100 Euro; ah, billig! Der Fernseher kostet 1000 Euro; teuer!

Mein Stock kostet zehn Euro. — Das ist zu teuer. — Wieviel Euro hast du? — Ich habe einen Euro. — Du hast nur einen Euro? Das ist zu wenig!

Willst du meinen Stock kaufen? Der Stock kostet fünf Euro. — Das ist zu teuer! — Warum, wieviel Geld hast du? — Ich habe drei Euro. — Ok, sie hat nur drei Euro, aber ich verkaufe ihr meinen Stock für drei Euro. Bitte, gib mir deine drei Euro. Hier ist mein Stock. Nimm meinen Stock.

Versteht ihr reich und arm? — Ja! (show the signs that I had forgotten)

Wer ist jetzt am reichsten? — Du bist jetzt am reichsten. — Wieviel Geld habe ich? — Du hast fünf Euro.

Wer ist jetzt am ärmsten? — Sie ist jetzt am ärmsten. — Wieviel Geld hat sie? — Sie hat kein Geld. Sie hat nichts.

Willst du mehr Geld? — Nein, ich will nicht mehr Geld. — Ok, dann nicht!

Willst du mehr Geld? — Ja, ich will mehr Geld. — Ok, dann musst du mir einen Stock verkaufen. — Den oder den? — Welcher Stock kostet mehr, der oder der? — Der kostet einen Euro, und der kostet vier Euro. — Und welcher kostet mehr? — Der kostet mehr. — Warum? — Weil der Stock länger ist.

Beispiel für “beide”: Wer ist die Tochter von V, sie oder du? — Wir beide!

Ich will beide Stöcke kaufen. Ich habe genug Geld. Hat sie genug Geld? — Nein, sie hat nicht genug Geld. Sie hat gar kein Geld! — Ich schenke ihr etwas Geld.

Ich schenke dir drei Euro. — Danke!

Hat sie jetzt genug Geld für deine zwei Stöcke?

Ihre Stöcke kosten fünf Euro. Hast du genug Geld? Fünf Euro sind genug. Vier Euro sind nicht genug. Du hast drei Euro. Hast du genug Euro? — Nein, ich habe nicht genug Euro. Ich habe zu wenig Euro. — Wenn du ihre Stöcke kaufen willst, dann brauchst du mehr Geld. Du hast nicht genug Geld. Ich habe genug Geld. Ich habe fünf Euro. Ich kaufe ihre beiden Stöcke.

She gives me the two sticks, but one of the sticks is broken at the end.

Der Stock ist kaputt! Du hast den Stock kaputt gemacht! Ich will einen Euro zurück! — Ok, ich gebe dir einen Euro zurück.

M (surprised): Ich habe fünf Euro. Du hattest sechs Euro, nicht fünf! — Doch, ich hatte fünf Euro. Ich habe dir meine fünf Euro gegeben, aber dann hast du mir einen Euro zurückgegeben. Darum habe ich jetzt einen Euro. Weil du mir einen Euro zurückgegeben hast.

Wer hat jetzt am meisten Stöcke? — Du hast jetzt am meisten Stöcke.

Wer hat jetzt am meisten Geld? — Du hast jetzt am meisten Geld. — Ich verkaufe meinen kleinen Stock für drei Euro. — Ich gebe dir drei Euro für deinen kleinen Stock. — Ok, danke!

F: Ich verkaufe meinen Stock! — S: Für wieviel? — F: Ich will zwei Euro. — S: Willst du ihn kaufen? — M: Ja, ich will deinen Stock kaufen. — S: Ich will deinen Stock auch kaufen. — F: Ich gebe dir drei Euro. — M, hast du nicht genug Geld? — Nein, ich habe nicht genug Geld. — Pech gehabt :)

Pech ist das Gegenteil von Glück.

Ich verkaufe meinen Stock für drei Euro. — Ich gebe dir drei Euro für deinen Stock.

Wer hat jetzt den kürzesten Stock? — Sie hat jetzt den kürzesten Stock.

Willst du meinen Stock haben? — Ja, ich will deinen Stock haben. — Ok, dann klau ihn!

Wo ist mein Stock?! — Sie hat ihn geklaut! — M, stimmt das? — Nein, das stimmt nicht! Sie hat ihn geklaut! — Wem soll ich glauben? Ich glaube dir nicht! Ich glaube ihr.

Weisst du, warum ich dir nicht glaube? — Weil du meinen Stock hast! :) — Sie hat ihn geklaut und mir gegeben. — Stimmt das? Du hast ihn geklaut und ihr gegeben? — Nein, ich habe Wasser getrunken! — Das ist keine gute Ausrede.

Versteht ihr “Ausrede”? — Nein.

Ok, ein Beispiel. Wann ist Schule? Wann beginnt die Schule? — Um acht. — Ok, Schule beginnt um acht, aber du schläfst bis neun; du verschläfst. Du kommst um zehn zur Schule. Zwei Stunden zu spät. Viel zu spät. Dein Lehrer fragt dich: “Warum bist du zu spät?”, und du sagst, “Ich war krank”. Das ist eine Ausrede.

Das mit dem Wasser ist eine Ausrede. Sie sagt, du hast den Stock geklaut und ihr gegeben. Ich glaube ihr! Aber du musst mir meinen Stock zurückgeben. — Danke!

Now F’s stick is stolen! I get it and give it to M.

Wer hat mir meinen Stock geklaut. — Wer hat meinen Stock geklaut! — Sie hat deinen Stock geklaut. Sie hat deinen Stock! — Nein, er hat deinen Stock geklaut und mir gegeben!

The last sentence by M is one of the times when they say a perfectly correct sentence without any hints from me or others.

Sie lügt! Verstehst du “lügen”? Ich lüge, wenn ich sage “sie war’s!”. Oder ein anderes Beispiel: Sie fragt mich: “Wie alt bist du?”, ich antworte “Ich bin fünf Jahre alt”. Ich lüge.

Noch ein Beispiel für “lügen”. Du fragst mich, “Wer ist sie?”, ich sage “Das ist Lukas!”; das stimmt nicht, du lügst! Lügen bedeutet, lügen ist, ich weiß, sie ist M, aber ich sage, sie ist Lukas. Ich lüge!

Energy is low for a while, so as I don’t have any better idea, I try to throw the cup around, because that worked pretty well last time.

Wer will den orangenen Becher fangen? — Ich will den orangenen Becher fangen! — Ok, ich werfe den orangenen Becher, und du fängst ihn.

Throwing the cup, F catches it.

Was ist passiert? — Du hast den orangenen Becher geworfen, und sie hat ihn gefangen.

Ich frage dich: was ist passiert? — Du hast den orangenen Becher geworfen, und ich habe ihn gefangen.

Willst du [M] ihn auch fangen? — Ja, ich will ihn auch fangen. — Ok, dann musst du [F] ihn werfen.

M misses the cup, it falls to the ground.

Du hast ihn fast gefangen! Was ist passiert? — Ich habe den orangenen Becher geworfen, und sie hat ihn fast gefangen.

M plays the Caipt’n Hook game with the cup.

Ich habe keine linke Hand. — Egal! :) — F: Oh, M schreibt mit der linken Hand! — Ah, Pech gehabt! :)

Linke Hand ab, aber Rechtshänder: Glück gehabt! Linke Hand ab, aber Linkshänder: Pech gehabt! Du kannst dann nicht mehr schreiben! Jetzt musst du mit rechts schreiben.

F, Schreibst du mit links oder mit rechts? — Ich schreibe mit links. — Du schreibst auch mit links? — Ja. — Ah, ihr schreibt beide mit links! — Meine Mutter schreibt mit rechts, mein Vater schreibt mit rechts, meine Oma und mein Opa schreiben mit rechts, aber wir beide schreiben mit links.

I get a call, ted for a minute.

Wo waren wir? Ah, links und rechts! Wer schreibt mit links? — F und ich, wir beide schreiben mit links. — Wer schreibt hier mit rechts? — Du schreibst mit rechts.

F: Ich kann mit dem Fuß schreiben! — Wirklich? — Nein

Wer kann mit dem Fuß schreiben? — Niemand kann mit dem Fuß schreiben. — Schade!

Wer will mein Geld geschenkt haben? — Ich will dein Geld geschenkt haben! — Sie war die erste, du warst die zweite. Ich teile mein Geld. Du kriegst zwei Euro, und du kriegst auch zwei Euro.

F: Ich schenke dir drei Euro! — M: Ich schenke dir zwei Euro. — S: Oh danke, sehr nett von euch!

Kann ich deinen [F] Stock haben? — Ja, ich schenke dir meinen Stock.

Kann ich deinen [M] Stock auch haben? — Ja, du kannst meinen Stock auch haben. — Danke! — Bitte!

Wer hat jetzt alle Stöcke? — Du hast jetzt alle Stöcke. — Genau. Ich nehme die Stöcke, und tue sie in die Tasche.

Willst du einen roten Stift oder einen blauen Stift? — M: Ich will einen blauen Stift. — F: Ich will einen roten Stift!! — Du kriegst einen roten Stift. Glück gehabt!

Fragst du sie bitte, ob sie ihren Stift aufmacht? — Ja, ich frage sie, ob sie ihren Stift aufmacht. M, machst du bitte deinen Stift auf? — Ja, ich mache meinen Stift.

F: Ich will deinen Becher. — Nein, sie gibt ihn dir nicht. — Ich klaue deinen Becher! — Ich gebe ihn dir später!

Kein Geld mehr auf dem Tisch, nur Stifte.

Welcher Stift ist auf? — Ihr Stift ist auf. — Ist dein Stift auch auf? — Nein, mein Stift ist nicht auf. Mein Stift ist zu. — Ist mein Stift auf? — Nein, dein Stift ist nicht auf. — Das stimmt. Ich mache ihn auf.

Ist mein Stift jetzt auf? — Ja, jetzt ist dein Stift auf.

Mach bitte deinen Stift auch auf. — Ok, ich mache meinen Stift auch auf.

Welche Stifte sind jetzt auf? — Jetzt sind alle Stifte auf.

Wir machen jetzt alle unsere Stifte wieder zu.

Was ist passiert? — Wir alle haben unsere Stifte wieder zugemacht.

Bist du müde? — Ja, ich bin müde. — Es ist spät.

Wie spät ist es? — Ich weiß es nicht.

Wie spät ist es? — Es ist fast zwanzig vor acht. — Es ist spät, es ist abend.

Kennt ihr “morgen, mittag, abend”? — Ja!

Ist jetzt morgen oder abend? — Jetzt ist abend.

F: Morgen, übermorgen? — Nein; gestern, heute, morgen. Aber: morgen, mittag, abend.

Was ist morgen? — Morgen ist Dienstag, übermorgen ist Mittwoch. — Und danach? — Danach ist Donnerstag. — Und dann? — Dann ist Freitag. — Dann ist Samstag. — Und dann? — Dann ist Sonntag. — Und dann? — Montag. — Und dann? :) …

Noch eine Liste: Frühling, Sommer, Herbst, Winter.

Ist jetzt Winter? — Nein, jetzt ist nicht Winter. Jetzt ist Herbst. — Ja, jetzt ist Herbst. Aber es ist wie Sommer. Heute, und gestern.

Wir hören auf, ok? Es ist spät. Wir sind müde.

Wisst ihr, wann wir morgen spielen können? Können wir morgen spielen? — Meine Mutter schickt dir eine SMS.

No game on Friday/Saturday, three hours today on Sunday, from 10:30am to 13:30.

Wie spät ist es? — Ich weiß, nicht, wie spät es ist. — Willst du wissen, wie spät es ist? — Ja, ich will wissen, wie spät es ist. — Ok, dann frag sie! Wie spät ist es? — Ich weiß auch nicht, wie spät es ist. … — Sie will wissen, wie spät es ist; du auch? — Ja, … Wie spät ist es? — Es ist zwanzig vor elf.

Ist es genau zwanzig vor elf? — Nein, es ist nicht genau zwanzig vor elf, es ist ungefähr zwanzig vor elf.

I put a handful of pens on the table very quickly. It’s a mess :)

Das sind ungefähr acht Stifte. (counting them) Ah, neun! Ungefähr acht Stifte. Sie ist ungefähr zehn Jahre alt.

V: Wieviele Euro habe ich in meinem Portmonnaie? — Ungefähr zwanzig Euro. Nicht genau, ungefähr.

Wie spät ist es? — Es ist fast viertel vor elf.

Liste: drittel, viertel, fünftel, sechstel…

Die Ausnahme ist “halb”. Versteht Ihr das? Ich prüfe das.

I’m laying three black pens and a red pen on the table.

Welcher Stift ist die Ausnahme? — Der rote Stift ist die Ausnahme. — Warum ist der rote Stift die Ausnahme, weisst du es? — Weil der Stift rot ist. Die anderen Stifte sind schwarz.

V: Die Kinder sind Zwillinge, aber sie sind auch Ausnahme?

The twins are not identical, so she thinks it means “different” :)

Nein; hier (showing a red and a black pen) gibt es keine Ausnahmen; einer ist schwarz, einer ist rot; sie sind verschieden. Ausnahme ist: gleich, gleich, gleich, gleich, gleich; verschieden! Hundert gleich, einer ist anders, das ist eine Ausnahme.

Was ist das? Das ist mein schwarzer Stift.

Was ist das? Das ist mein roter Stift.

Was ist das? Das ist mein blauer Stift.

Was ist das? Das ist mein metallener Schlüssel.

Was ist die Ausnahme? — Der Schlüssel ist die Ausnahme.

Versteht Ihr “beginnt” und “aufhört“? — Nein. — Das Buch beginnt hier, und hört hier auf. Anfang und Ende. Das Buch beginnt am Anfang, und hört am Ende auf. Hör auf, Griechisch zu sprechen! :)

I put only four pens on the table, three black and one blue.

Kannst du deinen schwarzen Stift aufmachen? — Ich habe meinen schwarzen Stift aufgemacht.

Welcher Stift ist die Ausnahme? — Ihr Stift ist die Ausnahme.

Warum ist ihr Stift die Ausnahme? — Weil der Stift auf ist.

F talks Greek again :) Kein Griechisch. Wenn du Griechisch sprichst, lernst du kein Deutsch. Darum kein Griechisch :)

Liste: gut, besser, am besten.

Das ist besser für dich. Ist dein Stift auch auf? — Nein, mein Stift ist nicht auf. Mein Stift ist zu.

I drink my coffee.

Ist der Kaffee zu heiß? — Nein, der Kaffee ist genau richtig. Sehr warm, aber nicht zu heiß.

Kannst du sie fragen, ob sie ihren Stift zumachen kann? (Limit!!)

Kannst du sie fragen, ob sie ihren Stift zumacht? — Machst du deinen Stift bitte zu?

Liste: Wer, wen, wem?

Wen hast du zugemacht? — Ich habe meinen schwarzen Stift zugemacht.

Machst du deinen roten Stift bitte auf? — Ja, ich mache meinen roten Stift auf.

Ist dein roter Stift auf oder zu? — Mein roter Stift ist auf.

Now only one pen open.

Welcher Stift ist die Ausnahme? — Ihr Stift die Ausnahme.

Warum ist ihr Stift die Ausnahme? — Weil ihr roter Stift auf ist.

Und die anderen? — Die anderen sind zu.

I’m considering to introduce “offen/geschlossen”, but decide to stay with “auf/zu” for now. Looking back, we already had “öffnen/schließen”.

F: Ich komme zurück. — Versprochen?

Welcher Stift ist die Ausnahme? — Mein roter Stift ist die Ausnahme.

Warum ist dein Stift die Ausnahme? — Weil mein roter Stift auf ist, und die anderen zu.

Fragst du sie bitte, ob sie ihren Stift aufmacht? Ich helfe dir! Wenn du etwas nicht verstehst, dann frag mich! — Machst du deinen Stift bitte auf? — Ja, ich mache meinen blauen Stift auf. Fragst du mich bitte, ob ich meinen schwarzen Stift aufmache? — Machst du deinen schwarzen Stift bitte auf? — Ja, …

Welcher Stift ist jetzt die Ausnahme? — Jetzt ist mein schwarzer Stift die Ausnahme. — Warum ist dein schwarzer Stift jetzt die Ausnahme? — Weil jetzt mein schwarzer Stift zu ist und die anderen auf sind.

Welche Stifte sind Ausnahmen? — Ihr und ihr Stifte sind Ausnahmen. — Warum sind sie Ausnahmen? — Ihr Stift ist blau, und ihr Stift ist zu.

Warum ist dein Stift eine Ausnahme? — Weil er zu ist. Ist dein Stift eine Ausnahme? — Nein, mein Stift ist keine Ausnahme. etc.

Welche Stifte sind gleich? — Mein Stift und dein Stift sind gleich.

Warum sind dein Stift und dein Stift gleich? — Weil sie beide schwarz und auf sind.

Sind mein Stift und ihr Stift gleich? — Nein, dein Stift und ihr Stift sind nicht gleich. — Warum nicht? — Weil dein Stift auf ist und ihrer zu.

The mother V again is struggling with understanding the grammar behind it; I shortly switch to English, reminding her of No Thinking, No Suffering. F reminds us joyfully to speak “Kein Englisch!” :)

Du hast recht! Aber das war eine Ausnahme!

Warum sind beide Stifte nicht gleich? — Weil der eine auf ist und der andere zu. Aber beide Stifte sind schwarz. Die Farbe ist gleich.

Ich frage euch: Sind eure Stifte gleich? — Nein, unsere Stifte sind nicht gleich. — Warum sind eure Stifte nicht gleich? — Weil der eine zu ist und der andere auf. — Ist die Farbe gleich? — Ja, die Farbe ist gleich. Beide sind schwarz. — Sind beide Stifte schwarz? — Ja, beide Stifte sind schwarz.

Sind eure Stifte gleich? — Nein, …? — Warum nicht …? — Weil der eine blau ist und der andere schwarz. etc.

Liste: der eine, der andere.

Showing my hands: Die eine, die andere. Die eine Hand, die andere Hand. Der eine Fuß, der andere Fuß. Das eine Buch, das andere Buch.

Wieviele Stifte sind auf? — Drei Stifte sind auf. — Wieviele Stifte sind zu? — Nur ein Stift ist zu.

Welcher Stift ist zu? — Mein Stift ist zu. — Ist ihr Stift auch zu? — Nein, ihr Stift ist nicht zu. Ihr Stift ist auf. Nur mein Stift ist zu.

Machst du bitte deinen Stift auf? — Ja, ich mache meinen Stift auf.

Was ist passiert? — Sie hat ihren schwarzen Stift aufgemacht.

Welche Stifte sind jetzt auf? — Jetzt sind alle Stifte auf.

Welche Stifte sind jetzt zu? — Jetzt ist kein Stift zu.

Warum ist kein Stift mehr zu? — Weil wir alle Stifte aufgemacht haben. Darum ist kein Stift mehr zu.

Welcher Stift ist jetzt die Ausnahme? — Ihr Stift ist jetzt die Ausnahme. — Warum ist ihr Stift jetzt die Ausnahme? — Weil ihr Stift blau ist und die anderen schwarz.

Wer hat den blauen Stift? — Sie hat den blauen Stift.

Bitte frag sie, ob sie ihren Stift zumacht. — M, machst du deinen bitte Stift zu? — Ja, ich mache meinen Stift zu.

Bitte frag sie, ob sie ihren Stift aufmacht. — …

V: Kann ich nochmal sie fragen? — Bitte, ja!

V: Fragst du sie bitte, ob sie ihren Stift zumacht?

This sentence came from V without any help :) V is not doing many signs.

Die Zeichen helfen dir, aber auch anderen. Wenn du redest, und sie versteht das Wort nicht, aber sie versteht das Zeichen, hilfst du ihr. Darum besser mit Zeichen.

Welcher Stift ist die Ausnahme? — Mein Stift ist die Ausnahme. — Warum? — Weil mein Stift blau ist und zu.

Liste: lang, kurz.

Meine Haare sind kurz. Ich habe kurze Haare. Ihr habt lange Haare. Du hast mittel-lange Haare.

Wer hat die kürzesten Haare? — Du hast die kürzesten Haare.

Wer hat die längsten Haare? — Wir haben die längsten Haare. — Eure Haare sind genau gleich lang? Ungefähr, aber nicht genau. Wer hat die längeren Haare? — Sie hat die längeren Haare. — Dann hast du die längsten Haare. Du hast die zweitlängsten Haare. Du hast die drittlängsten Haare. Ich habe die kürzesten Haare.

Wer hat die zweitkürzesten Haare? — Sie hat die zweitkürzesten Haare.

Wer hat die drittkürzesten Haare? — Sie hat die drittkürzesten Haare.

Wer hat die wärmsten Schuhe? — Sie hat die wärmsten Schuhe.

Du hast keine Schuhe. Ich habe Schuhe, aber nicht sehr warme.

The girls want to distinguish between shoes and slippers.

Ihr habt die gleichen Pantoffeln! Wer hat keine Pantoffeln? — Du hast keine Pantoffeln!

F seems to be hungry.

Hast du Hunger? Willst du etwas essen? — Nein, ich will nichts essen.

Hat sie Hunger? — Ja, aber sie will nichts essen, weil sie spielen will. — Du kannst kurz etwas essen und dann wieder spielen!

V: Ich mache zwei Zwieback, mit Butter und Marmelade. — Bitte nur mit Butter, nicht mit Marmelade. — Spielt weiter!

Wer hat keine Pantoffeln? — Du hast keine Pantoffeln.

Hast du kalte Füße? — Nein, ich habe keine kalten Füße. Ich habe warme Füße. etc.

Der eine Fuß, der andere Fuß.

Warum hast du keine kalten Füße? — Weil ich Pantoffeln habe.

V. comes back with Zwieback, and some juice. To be exact, “Fruchtsaftgetränk”, which is nutrition legalese for juice with water and sugar.

Ich gebe dir drei, weil sie zu klein sind.

Fruchtsaft: Ein Apfel ist eine Frucht; Eine Orange ist eine Frucht, eine Banane ist eine Frucht. Fruchtsaftgetränk bedeutet Saft mit Wasser und Zucker. Saft ist nur Saft. Saftgetränk ist Saft mit Wasser und Zucker.

Du hast warme Füße, weil du Pantoffeln hast. Ich habe warme Füße, obwohl ich keine Pantoffeln habe.

V. joins the game.

Wir alle haben warme Füße. Niemand hat kalte Füße. — Ich habe kalte Füße. — Ah, sehr gut! :) Sie hat warme Füße, weil sie Pantoffeln hat. Sie hat auch warme Füße, weil sie Pantoffeln hat. Ich habe auch warme Füße, obwohl ich keine Pantoffeln habe. Du hast kalte Füße, obwohl du Pantoffeln hast! Du hast trotzdem kalte Füße! — Ich habe immer kalte Füße. Sommer, Winter, …

I’m using the sign for “aber” for “obwohl”; ASL does the same in English.

List: Frühling, Sommer, Herbst, Winter.

Ist jetzt Frühling? — Ja, jetzt ist Frühling. — Nein, jetzt ist kein Frühling! Es ist noch nicht Winter. Es ist fast Winter. Was kommt vor Winter? Was kommt vorher?

Frag sie, was vor Winter kommt. — Was kommt vor Winter? — Vor Winter kommt Herbst.

Was kommt vor Herbst? — Vor Herbst kommt Sommer.

Was kommt vor Sommer? — Vor Sommer kommt Frühling.

Was kommt vor Frühling? — Vor Frühling kommt Winter.

Biting into the Zwieback.

Oh, der Zwieback ist hart! — Ja, aber lecker :)

Ist der Zwieback weich? — ?

“Weich” ist das Gegenteil von “hart”. Der Zwieback ist hart. Das Kissen ist weich.

Was ist das Gegenteil von “weich”? — Das Gegenteil von “weich” ist “hart”.

Was ist das Gegenteil von “hart”? — Das Gegenteil von “hart” ist “weich”.

Ist der Zwieback weich? — Nein, der Zwieback ist nicht weich. Der Zwieback ist hart.

M struggles with opening the sealed straw of the juice.

Was macht sie? — Sie macht den Strohhalm auf.

Was hast du gemacht? — Ich habe einen Strohhalm aufgemacht.

Wo ist dein Strohhalm? — Mein Strohhalm ist im Saft.

Der Saft ist süß und lecker.

Ist heute Samstag? — Nein, heute ist nicht Samstag. Heute ist Sonntag.

Ist morgen Samstag? — Nein, morgen ist nicht Samstag. Morgen ist Montag.

F: Morgen ist Schule :( — Freust du dich? — Nein, ich freue mich nicht! — Warum nicht? — Weil ich um sechs Uhr aufstehen muss. — Das ist zu früh.

Wo ist dein Teller? — Mein Teller ist unter deinem Teller, und dein Teller ist unter ihrem Teller.

For some reason we have summer weather in late October, with record temperatures.

M: Gut heute. — Ja, schönes Wetter. Es ist fast wie Sommer. Nicht wie Winter. Es ist warm, und schön.

Mein Saft ist leer. Ist dein Saft voll oder leer? — Mein Saft ist fast leer.

F spilled her juice onto her pants.

Wo ist dein Saft? — Dein Saft ist auf deiner Hose, und auf deinem Arm. :)

F. comes back.

Machen wir weiter? Spielen wir wieder? Wir haben Pause gemacht, jetzt machen wir weiter. — F: Ich verstehe nicht “weiter”.

I stand up, and demonstrate it with M, who has already understood it.

M: Geh! Stop! Geh weiter! etc.

Jetzt ein anderes Beispiel: “atmen“.

M: Stop! Atme weiter! Stop!

Every time she says “stop”, i stop breathing :)

Welcher Stift ist die Ausnahme? — Ihr Stift ist die Ausnahme! — Warum ist ihr Stift die Ausnahme? — Weil ihr Stift blau ist.

Machst du bitte deinen Stift auf? — Ok, ich mache meinen Stift auf.

Welcher Stift ist jetzt die Ausnahme? — Mein Stift und dein Stift sind jetzt die Ausnahme.

Warum ist dein Stift die Ausnahme? — Weil mein Stift blau ist.

Und warum ist mein Stift jetzt die Ausnahme? — Weil dein Stift auf ist.

F is frustrated that it is “blau ist” and not “ist blau”, and wants it explained. M answers her “Deutsch!” :)

Wollt ihr eure Stifte tauschen? — Ja, wir wollen unsere Stifte tauschen.

Was ist passiert? — Ich habe ihr meinen schwarzen Stift gegeben, und sie hat mir ihren blauen Stift gegeben.

Habt ihr getauscht? — Ja, wir haben getauscht.

War es ein guter Tausch? — Ja es war ein guter Tausch. — Für euch beide? — Ja, für uns beide.

Ich habe einen hässlichen schwarzen Stein. Sie hat einen schönen weißen Stein. Komm, wir tauschen! Willst du deinen schönen weißen Stein mit meinem hässlichen schwarzen Stein tauschen? — Ja, ich will meinen schönen weißen Stein mit deinem hässlichen schwarzen Stein tauschen.

War das ein guter Tausch oder ein schlechter Tausch? — Für mich war es ein schlechter Tausch, für dich war es ein guter Tausch.

Warum war es für dich ein guter Tausch? — Weil ich jetzt einen schönen weißen Stein habe.

War es für sie auch ein guter Tausch? — Nein, für sie war es kein guter Tausch. Für sie war es ein schlechter Tausch.

Warum war es für sie ein schlechter Tausch? — Weil sie jetzt einen hässlichen schwarzen Stein hat.

Ist mein Kaffee voll oder leer? — Dein Kaffee ist fast leer.

Ist mein Kaffee heiß oder kalt, was glaubt ihr? — Ich glaube, dein Kaffee ist kalt.

Glaubst du auch? — Ja, ich glaube auch, dein Kaffee ist kalt. Ihr habt recht! Mein Kaffee ist kalt.

Drinking the last bit.

Dein Kaffee ist jetzt leer.

Bringing the orange cup into play.

Nicht berühren!

Of course everybody touches it :)

Wer hat den orangenen Becher zuerst berührt? — Du hast den orangenen Becher zuerst berührt.

Wer hat ihn dann berührt? — Dann hat sie ihn berührt.

Und wer hat ihn zuletzt berührt? — Ich habe ihn zuletzt berührt.

Was ist im orangenen Becher? — Im orangenen Becher ist nichts.

Ist der orangene Becher voll oder leer? — Der orangene Becher ist leer.

F hides the white rock under the cup.

Gute Idee!

M puts on the sleeping mask.

F, versteck bitte ihren hässlichen schwarzen Stein.

V: Tschüss, morgen gehe ich zur VHS (adult school). — Aber du lernst mehr hier :) — Ja, ich weiß…

M, wo ist dein hässlicher schwarzer Stein? — Sie hat ihn versteckt.

Wo hat sie ihn versteckt? — Ich sage es dir nicht. Du musst es uns sagen!

Ist mein hässlicher schwarzer Stein unter dem orangenen Becher? — Ja, dein hässlicher schwarzer Stein ist unter dem orangenen Becher.

Wo war dein hässlicher schwarzer Stein? — Mein hässlicher schwarzer Stein war unter ihrem orangenen Becher.

Wo ist dein hässlicher schwarzer Stein jetzt? — Jetzt ist mein hässlicher schwarzer Stein auf ihrem orangenen Becher. etc.

Ich bitte dich: Bitte nimm deinen hässlichen schwarzen Stein.

F: Nicht berühren!!

Wenn sie den Stein nehmen will, muss sie ihn berühren.

F shows how to take the rock without touching it: by putting the cup over it and moving the cup :)

Du hast recht, sehr gut!

Muss sie den Stein, wenn sie ihn nehmen will? — Nein, sie muss den Stein berühren, wenn sie ihn nehmen will. Sie kann den Becher nehmen.

Nimm deinen hässlichen schwarzen Stein zurück, aber berühr ihn nicht!

Was ist jetzt im orangenen Becher? — Im orangenen Becher ist jetzt nichts. Der orangene Becher ist leer.

Ist der orangene Becher voll? — Nein, der orangene Becher ist nicht voll, der orangene Becher ist leer.

F makes some really ugly grimaces :)

Ist F jetzt schön oder hässlich? — F ist jetzt hässlich.

Wie spät ist es? — Ich weiß nicht, wie spät es ist.

Wie spät ist es? — Es ist fast ein Uhr. Noch zwei Minuten.

Wann ist es genau ein Uhr? — In zwei Minuten. Gleich.

Sollen wir ihr unsere Steine schenken? — Ja, wir schenken ihr unsere Steine.

F, wir schenken dir unsere Steine, aber wir berühren sie nicht.

Was machen wir? — Zuerst nimmst du ihren orangenen Becher.

F is distracted.

Pass auf, weil gleich frage ich dich “was ist passiert?” :)

Dann nimmst du deinen weißen Stein mit ihrem orangenen Becher.

Dann gibst du mir ihren orangenen Becher.

Dann nehme ich meinen schwarzen Stein mit ihrem orangenen Becher.

Und dann gebe ich ihr ihren orangenen Becher mit unseren Steinen.

Was ist passiert? Langsam! — Zuerst hast du meinen orangenen Becher genommen. Dann hast du deinen weißen Stein in meinem orangenen Becher versteckt. Dann hast du ihr meinen orangenen Becher mit deinem weißen Stein gegeben. Dann hat sie ihren hässlichen schwarzen Stein im orangenen Becher versteckt. Und dann hat sie mir meinen orangenen Becher zurückgegeben. Und dann hat sie mir meinen orangenen Becher mit deinem schönen weißen Stein und ihrem hässlichen schwarzen Stein zurückgegeben.

Woraus ist der orangene Becher gemacht? — Der orangene Becher ist aus Plastik.

Liste: Glas, Metall, Plastik, Stein, Papier, Holz.

Was ist Holz? — Der Stock ist aus Holz. Der Boden ist aus Holz.

The floor is made of artificial wood though :)

Der Boden ist nicht aus Holz. Der Boden ist aus Plastik! :)

Was ist aus Holz? — Der Stock ist aus Holz.

Aus was ist der Schrank? — Der Schrank ist auch aus Holz.

Ist der Becher auch aus Holz? — Nein, der Becher ist nicht aus Holz. Der Becher ist aus Plastik.

Der Boden ist auch aus Plastik.

Examining the sleeping mask…

Das ist auch nur aus Plastik. Der Stoff ist auch aus Plastik.

Der Schuh ist aus Stoff, und der Stoff ist aus Plastik :)

The girls find any chain game very much fun.

Ist der Tisch nur aus Plastik? — Nein, der Tisch ist auch aus Metall.

Ist der mittlere Schrank nur aus Holz? — Nein, der mittlere Schrank ist nicht nur aus Holz. Der mittlere Schrank ist auch aus Glas und aus Metall, und aus Plastik.

Woraus ist die Batterie? — Die Batterie ist aus Metall, und aus ein bisschen Plastik.

Ist der Stock auch aus Metall? — Nein, der Stock ist nicht aus Metall. Der Stock ist aus Holz.

Aus was ist der Schlüsselbund? — Der Schlüsselbund ist aus Plastik, Metall und Stoff.

Woraus ist dieser Schlüssel? — Dieser Schlüssel ist aus Plastik und aus Metall.

Ist dieser Schlüssel auch aus Plastik und aus Metall? — Nein, dieser Schlüssel ist nur aus Metall.

The girls are examining the €-cent coins that I put on the table to check for material, trying to find out from what country they originate.

Dieser Cent ist aus Österreich. Dieser Cent ist aus Frankreich.

Welche Münze ist kleiner, die braune oder die gelbe? — Die braune Münze ist kleiner als die gelbe Münze.

Again trying out if now is the time to introduce non-male objects… One idea is to use “die Münze” and “auf der Münze” in the same sentence over and over again, so that the girls get it. The game goes like this:

Wo ist die kleine Münze? — Die kleine Münze ist auf der großen Münze.

Wo ist die große Münze? — Die große Münze ist auf der Tischdecke.

Wo ist die Tischdecke? — Die Tischdecke ist auf dem Tisch.

Wo ist der Tisch? — Der Tisch ist auf dem Boden.

Wo ist die braune Münze? — Die braune Münze ist auf der gelben Münze.

Wo ist die gelbe Münze? — Die gelbe Münze ist auf der Tischdecke. etc.

Rückwarts: unter.

Worunter ist der Boden? — Der Boden ist unter dem Tisch.

Worunter ist der Tisch? — Der Tisch ist unter der Tischdecke. etc.

Die Münze; unter der Münze. Der Tisch, unter dem Tisch.

Wo ist die braune Münze? — Die braune Münze ist ganz oben.

Woraus ist die braune Münze? — Die braune Münze ist aus Metall.

Woraus is die gelbe Münze? — Die gelbe Münze ist auch aus Metall.

Woraus ist die Tischdecke? — Die Tischdecke ist aus Stoff, aber der Stoff ist aus Plastik.

Ich glaube, der Stoff ist aus Plastik.

Woraus ist der kleine Tisch? — Der kleine Tisch ist aus Glas und Metall.

Woraus ist der große Tisch? — Der große Tisch ist aus Plastik und aus Metall.

Woraus ist das Fenster? — Das Fenster ist aus Glas, Metall und Plastik.

Woraus ist der linke Schrank? — Der linke Schrank ist aus Metall und aus Holz.

Woraus ist der rechte Schrank? — Der rechte Schrank ist aus Holz, Metall und Plastik.

Woraus ist der große Schrank? — Der große Schrank ist aus Holz, Metall, Plastik und Glas.

Woraus ist das Buch? — Das Buch ist aus Papier.

Woraus ist Papier? — Papier ist aus Holz. Aus Holz gemacht.

Woraus ist Glas gemacht, wisst ihr das? — Glas ist aus Stein.

Was ist schwerer, das Buch oder das Sofa? — Das Sofa ist schwerer als das Buch.

F: Glas ist Sand! — Aber Sand sind kleine Steine! Sand ist aus Stein. Glas ist aus Sand, und Sand ist aus Stein.

Das Fenster ist aus Glas, das Glas ist aus Sand, und Sand ist aus Stein.

Wir hören jetzt auf, weil ich gehen muss.

Wir spielen wieder …

Liste: vorgestern, gestern, heute, morgen, übermorgen.

Liste: auf, unter, vor, hinter, …

Wir spielen morgen wieder. Ich glaube, um sechs.

Thursday, playing from 8pm to about 10pm.

V to M: Willst du closen die dur? — Willst du die Tür schließen?

Liste: öffnen, schließen.

Kannst du bitte die Tür schließen? (M closes the door)

F, kannst du bitte die Tür wieder öffnen? (F laughs, opens the door)

M, kannst du bitte die Tür wieder schließen? (Much laughter, closes the door again)

Liste: Zuerst, dann, zuletzt.

Ok, was ist passiert? — Zuerst hat sie die Tür geschlossen, dann hat sie die Tür geöffnet, und dann hat sie die Tür wieder geschlossen. (everybody asks the next person)

Liste: geöffnet, geschlossen.

Wer hat die Tür zuerst geöffnet? — Sie hat die Tür zuerst geöffnet. — Nein, das stimmt nicht :) Sie hat die Tür geschlossen; aber ich habe gefragt, wer die Tür geöffnet hat.

Ist die Tür geöffnet oder geschlossen? — Die Tür ist jetzt geschlossen.

Was hast du gefragt? — Ich habe gefragt, ob die Tür geöffnet oder geschlossen ist.

V: Entschuldigung F, kannst du die Lampe, äh, …? — Ausmachen.

Frag nochmal. — F, kannst du die Lampe ausmachen, weil sie zu hell für meine Augen ist? — Bitte mach sie aus.

Was hat sie gefragt? — Sie hat gefragt, ob ich die Lampe ausmachen kann. (everybody asks the next person)

Und wer hat die Tür geöffnet? — Ich habe die Tür geöffnet.

Wer hat die Tür geschlossen? — Sie hat die Tür geschlossen.

Wie oft hat sie die Tür geschlossen? Verstehst du? (the mother understands it, the daughters don’t)

Ich zeige euch “wie oft”. Ich nehme den Schlüssel. Ich nehme nochmal den Schlüssel. Ich nehme nochmal den Schlüssel. Wie oft habe ich den Schlüssel genommen? Ich habe den Schlüssel dreimal genommen. — Ahh!

Wie oft hat sie die Tür geschlossen? — Sie hat die Tür zweimal geschlossen.

Was ist das? — Das ist ein Schlüssel.

Wie oft hat er den Schlüssel genommen? — Er hat den Schlüssel dreimal genommen.

F, Bist du sehr müde oder nur ein bisschen müde? — Ich bin nur ein bisschen müde.

Wie spät ist es? — Ich weiß nicht, wie spät es ist.

Wie spät ist es? — Ich weiß auch nicht, wie spät es ist.

Wie spät ist es? — Ich weiß, wie spät es ist. Es ist fast zwanzig vor neun.

Wann ist es genau zwanzig vor neun? — In drei Minuten ist es genau zwanzig vor neun. — Das stimmt nicht! (a minute has passed since :) — In zwei Minuten ist es …

Trying to illustrate “fast”:

Ich fange den Stein. Ich werfe, ich fange. (almost catching the stone) Ich habe ihn fast gefangen. (almost letting it fall down) Ooh! Er wäre fast gefallen!

Kannst du bitte den weißen Stein werfen? (a black pen falls into the crack of the couch) Ah, darum werfe ich nicht den Schlüssel; ich brauche den Schlüssel. Darum werfe ich nicht den Schlüssel, sondern den Stein (Limit!!)

Wir werfen den Becher, besser als den Stein.

Ich werfe den Becher (throwing the plastic cup towards M without warning; she catches it). Sie hat den Becher gefangen.

Wer hat den Becher geworfen? — Ich habe den Becher geworfen.

Wer hat den Becher gefangen? — Sie hat den Becher gefangen.

Wen hat sie gefangen? — Den Becher.

Wer hat gefangen? — Sie.

I’m now using slightly different signs for “Wer/Wen/Wem”, using one/two/three fingers respectively.

Liste: Wer, wen, wem?

Das ist mein weißer Stein. Wem ist der weiße Stein? — Der weiße Stein ist dir.

Liste: Deutsch, Griechisch, Englisch.

In wem ist der weiße Stein? — Der weiße Stein ist im orangenen Becher.

Wer hat den hässlichen schwarzen Stein? — Ich habe den hässlichen schwarzen Stein.

Wer hat den schönen weißen Stein? — Er hat den schönen weißen Stein.

Willst du mit mir tauschen? — Ja, ich will mit dir tauschen. — Ok, wir tauschen.

Mit wem habe ich getauscht? — Du hast mit ihr getauscht.

Was habe ich getauscht? — Du hast den schwarzen Stein mit dem weißen Stein getauscht.

M is confused because at some occasions we say “Ich tausche den Stein mit dem Stock”, but at others “Ich tausche mit dir”, where the “mit” has a different meaning.

Kennt Ihr “tanzen”? — Ja!

I’m trying to get F to dance with me, she refuses :) So I invite her mother V, we’re dancing two steps.

Ich habe mit ihr getanzt. Mit wem habe ich getanzt? — Du hast mit ihr getanzt.

Mit wem hat sie getanzt? — Sie hat mit dir getanzt.

I’m putting two red pens onto the table, one with cap, one without.

Mit Deckel, ohne Deckel.

Ich habe mit ihr getanzt, jetzt tanze ich ohne sie.

I’m dancing alone.

Mit wem habe ich getanzt? — Du hast mit ihr getanzt.

Mit wem habe ich getauscht? — Du hast mit mir getauscht. (one round, everybody asking the next)

M, verstehst du es jetzt? — Ja.

Wie spät ist es jetzt? — Ich weiß nicht, wie spät es ist.

Dann frag sie! — Wie spät ist es? — Es ist genau neun!

V wants the girls to calm down, says “Bitte, bitte, bitte!“, F answers “Danke, danke, danke!” :)

Warum? — Darum! :)

Mama, warum muss ich jetzt schlafen gehen? — Darum!!

M, ich habe eine Frage an dich: Wo ist mein Schlüssel? — Dein Schlüssel ist in deinem orangenen Becher.

Liste: schwarz, rot, orange, …

Wer ist in meinem orangenen Becher? — Dein Schlüssel ist in deinem orangenen Becher.

Normalerweise schlafe ich um zwölf, aber morgen ist Party, morgen nicht!

Normalerweise sagt man: Wer? Der Mann, aber Was? Der Schlüssel. “Wer” ist nur für Personen.

This morphs almost into some grammar lesson for the mother, the daughters are losing interest and seem a bit tired.

Noch einmal werfen und fangen, ok? Wer will den orangenen Becher werfen? — Ich will den orangenen Becher werfen!

Wer will den orangenen Becher fangen? — Ich will den orangenen Becher fangen.

Ok, du wirfst, und du fängst!

Ok, noch einmal!

Noch einmal!

Ich frage dich: Wer hat den orangenen Becher geworfen? — Ich habe den orangenen Becher geworfen.

Wer hat den orangenen Becher gefangen? — Sie hat den orangenen Becher gefangen.

Nächste Frage: Wie oft hat sie den orangenen Becher geworfen? — Sie hat den orangenen Becher dreimal geworfen.

Wie oft hast du den orangenen Becher gefangen? — Ich habe den orangenen Becher dreimal gefangen.

Wer will den orangenen Becher verstecken? — Ich will den orangenen Becher verstecken.

Wer soll den orangenen Becher suchen? — Sie soll den orangenen Becher suchen.

Du sollst kein Griechisch reden. Ähnlich wie “musst”. Besser nicht.

Liste: Verstecken, suchen, finden.

The daughters are making a short break.

Liste: Ich will, ich habe, ich gebe, ich nehme, ich klaue, ich verstecke, ich kaufe, ich schenke.

“Ich verkaufe” ist das Gegenteil von “ich kaufe”.

Ich verkaufe meinen Schlüssel für zwei Euro. Willst du meinen Schlüssel kaufen? — Ja, ich will deinen Schlüssel kaufen. — Ok, dann gib mir zwei Euro. — Hier, dein neuer Schlüssel!

V: Ich gehe zu deinem Hause und ich klaue alles! :))

The daughters come back, M puts her cocoa on the table.

Nicht auf den Tisch bitte; unter den Tisch.

M burns her tongue on the hot cocoa.

Ist der Kakao zu kalt? — Nein, der Kakao ist zu heiß!

Phone rings, the mother V has to leave, is not present for the last hour.

Willst du mir deinen Schlüssel verkaufen? — Ich will dir meinen Schlüssel schenken. — Nicht verkaufen? — Nein, schenken. — Danke!

Verkaufen ist mit Geld. Mein Schlüssel kostet zwei Euro. — Ich gebe zwei Euro.

Was ist passiert? — Du hast meinen Schlüssel gekauft, und ich habe meinen Schlüssel verkauft.

Willst du mir deinen schönen Schlüssel verkaufen? — Nein, ich schenke dir meinen schönen Schlüssel. — Oh, danke! — Bitte.

So what can I do with the key I just got as a gift? Sell it to her sister :)

Willst du meinen schönen Schlüssel haben? — Ja, ich will deinen schönen Schlüssel haben. — Ok, ich verkaufe dir meinen schönen Schlüssel, für zwei Euro. — Ok, ich gebe dir zwei Euro. — Ich gebe dir meinen Schlüssel.

Now I’m giving F the money I got for her key. That’s what a nice guy I am ;)

Jetzt schenke ich dir zwei Euro.

F: Jetzt schenke ich dir einen Euro und dir einen Euro.

Ich kann deine zwei Euro wechseln.

Ich wechsle zwei Euro mit zweimal einem Euro.

Ich schenke dir einen Euro.

I steal M’s Euro, and give it to F.

Ich schenke dir einen Euro, hier! — Danke!

(to M:) Jemand hat deinen Euro geklaut! Ich weiß nicht wer; jemand! Ich glaube, sie war es!

Hast du meinen Euro geklaut?! — Nein, er hat deinen Euro geklaut!

Hat er meinen Euro geklaut? — Ja, er hat deinen Euro geklaut. Und er hat mir deinen Euro geschenkt. Ich gebe dir deinen Euro zurück.

Stimmt das?!

Glaubst du ihr?! SIE hat ihn geklaut, nicht ich!!

Glaub ihm nicht! Glaub mir!

Wem glaubst du mehr, ihr oder mir? — Ich glaube ihr mehr als dir.

M is confused because you can say “Ich glaube du hast ihn geklaut” but also “Ich glaube dir“, where “glaube” means slightly different things.

Ich glaube, sie hat ihn geklaut.

Wo ist der Stift? — Ich glaube, der Stift ist unter dem Tisch.

Aber: Ich sage, der Stift ist auf dem Tisch. Sie sagt, der Stift ist unter dem Tisch. Wem glaubst du, ihr oder mir? — Ich glaube ihr. Sie hat recht. Du hast nicht recht.

Wieviel ist zwei und zwei? — Zwei und zwei ist acht. — Du hast nicht recht!

Wieviel ist zwei und zwei? — Zwei und zwei ist vier. — Sie hat recht!

Wem glaubst du, ihr oder mir? — Ich glaube ihr. Sie hat recht.

Ich sage, sie hat den Euro geklaut. Sie sagt, ich habe den Euro geklaut. Wem glaubst du, ihr oder mir? — Ich glaube ihr. Sie hat recht.

Wieviele Euros habe ich? Du sagst die Wahrheit, und du nicht. Du lügst. — Du hast zwei Euro. — Nein, er hat vier Euro!

Nicht streiten!! :)

Wer hat recht? Wieviele Euros sagst du? — Ich sage zwei Euro.

Wieviele Euro sagst du? — Ich sage vier Euro. — Ich glaube ihr. Eins, zwei, ah! Sie hat recht. Du hast nicht recht.

Das ist ein metallener Schlüssel. Der Schlüssel ist aus Metall. Das Geld ist auch aus Metall.

Das Geld ist aus Metall. Der Becher ist aus Plastik. Das Buch ist aus Papier. Der Schlüssel ist auch aus Metall. Der Stift ist auch aus Plastik.

Woraus ist der rote Stift? — Der rote Stift ist aus Plastik.

Ist der Schlüssel auch aus Plastik? — Nein, der Schlüssel ist nicht aus Plastik, der Schlüssel ist aus Metall.

Ist der Schlüssel aus Metall? — Ja, der Schlüssel ist aus Metall.

Ist der rote Stift auch aus Metall? — Nein, der rote Stift ist nicht aus Metall, der rote Stift ist aus Plastik.

Ist der schwarze Stift auch aus Plastik? — Ja, der schwarze Stift ist auch aus Plastik.

Ist der schwarze Stein auch aus Plastik? — Nein, der schwarze Stein ist nicht aus Plastik, der schwarze Stein ist aus Stein.

Searching for something else in the room made of stone…

Die Fensterbank ist auch aus Stein. Das Fenster ist aus Glas.

Was ist hier aus Stein? — Nur die Fensterbank ist hier aus Stein. Sonst nichts.

Was ist hier aus Metall? — Der Schlüssel ist aus Metall. Die Lampe ist aus Metall. Die Heizung… Der Tisch ist aus Metall.

Ist der weiße Tisch nur aus Metall? — Nein, der Tisch ist nicht nur aus Metall. Der Tisch ist auch aus Plastik.

Wo ist der weiße Tisch aus Metall? — Der weiße Tisch ist unten aus Metall.

Wo ist der weiße Tisch aus Plastik? — Der weiße Tisch ist oben aus Plastik.

F finds some money under the table (40 cent, but we are used to call them Euro).

Wo hast du die 40 Euro gefunden, auf dem Tisch oder unter dem Tisch? — Ich habe die 40 Euro unter dem Tisch gefunden.

Liste: versteckt, gesucht, gefunden.

Du versteckst, du suchst, du findest.

Wer hat die 40 Euro gefunden? — Ich habe die 40 Euro gefunden.

Wer will den roten Stift verstecken? — Ich will den roten Stift verstecken.

Wer soll den roten Stift suchen? — Sie soll den roten Stift suchen.

Wenn du den roten Stift versteckst, dann kannst du ihn nicht suchen. Entweder verstecken oder suchen. Was willst du, verstecken oder suchen? — Ich will den roten Stift verstecken.

Willst du ihn suchen? — Ja, ich will ihn suchen.

I put a sleeping mask over her eyes.

Hast du den roten Stift versteckt? — Ja, ich habe den roten Stift versteckt.

Wo hast du den roten Stift versteckt? — Ich sage es nicht. — Schade! :(

Dann musst du den roten Stift suchen! Du musst ihn suchen! Aber mit Worten!

Ist der rote Stift unter der Lampe? — Nein, der rote Stift ist nicht unter der Lampe.

Ist der rote Stift auf dem Fensterbrett? — Nein, …

M found a blue pen on the windowsill.

Das ist ein blauer Stift, kein roter Stift.

Was hast du gefunden? — Ich habe einen blauen Stift gefunden.

Du musst den roten Stift finden! Suchen, und dann finden!

Links oder rechts? — Rechts.

Hier oder da? — Da.

Ist der rote Stift auf dem Tisch? — Nein, …

… hinter dem Fernseher? — Nein, …

… unter dem Sofa? — Nein, …

… auf dem Stuhl? — Ja, der rote Stift ist auf dem Stuhl.

Ist der rote Stift in der Jacke? — Ja, der rote Stift ist in der Jacke.

Here we have again a female object (Jacke), so F is slightly confused that it’s not “in dem Jacke”.

Ist der rote Stift in der linken oder rechten Tasche? — Der rote Stift ist in der rechten Tasche.

Here I could introduce the Genitiv, that I have avoided so far: “in der rechten Tasche der Jacke“. I do it twice, but don’t emphasize it. Later! :)

Du hast ihn gefunden!

Was ist passiert? — Sie hat den roten Stift versteckt, und ich habe ihn in der rechten Tasche der Jacke gefunden.

Wer versteckt den roten Stift jetzt? — Jetzt verstecke ich den roten Stift.

Wo hast du den roten Stift versteckt? — Ich sage es nicht. Du musst ihn suchen!

The red pen is inside a suitcase.

Ist der rote Stift auf dem Tisch? — Nein, …

Ist der rote Stift hinter dem Koffer? — Nein, der rote Stift ist nicht hinter dem Koffer!

F. does not understand the hint in the emphasis though :)

… hinter dem kleinen Schrank? — Nein, …

… im Korb? — Nein, …

… in der linken Tasche der roten Jacke? — Nein, …

… in der rechten Tasche? — Nein,der rote Stift ist auch nicht in der rechten Tasche.

… in der rechten/linken Tasche der weißen Jacke? — Nein, …

… im Schrank? — Nein, …

… hinter dem Fernseher? — Nein, …

F, frag nochmal mit dem Koffer. — Ah, ist der rote Stift im Koffer? — Ja, der rote Stift ist im Koffer!

Was ist passiert? — Ich habe den roten Stift versteckt, und sie hat ihn gesucht.

Hat sie ihn gefunden? — Ja, sie hat ihn gefunden.

Wo hat sie ihn gefunden? — Sie hat ihn im Koffer gefunden.

Schluss für heute!

One day break, played a bit more than two hours today (Tuesday), from 2pm to 4pm. F is down with fever, so it’s only three of us today, the mother V, the daughter M and me.

We’re eating some delicious chocolate/almond “olives” from Greece.

Iss alles! — Ok, ich versuche es!

Was hast du? — Ich habe einen alten bunten Stift und zwei Euro.

Was hast du? — Ich habe einen schönen weißen Stein und zwei Euro.

Was habe ich? — Du hast einen hässlichen schwarzen Stein und zwei Euro.

Zuerst ich, dann du, dann du. Ich fange an.

Willst du deinen alten bunten Stift mit meinem hässlichen schwarzen Stein tauschen? — Nein, ich will meinen alten bunten Stift nicht deinem hässlichen schwarzen Stein tauschen. — Warum nicht? — Weil dein schwarzer Stein zu hässlich ist! — Ok, ich gebe dir meinen schwarzen Stein und zwei Euro. — Ok, ich gebe dir meinen bunten Stift für deinen schwarzen Stein und zwei Euro.

Was hast du jetzt? — Jetzt habe ich vier Euro und einen hässlichen schwarzen Stein.

Du versuchst, mit ihr zu tauschen.

Willst du deinen schönen weißen Stein mit meinem hässlichen schwarzen Stein tauschen? — Nein, ich will meinen schönen weißen Stein nicht mit deinem hässlichen schwarzen Stein tauschen. — Ok, ich gebe dir meinen schwarzen Stein und zwei Euro. — Nein, das ist zu wenig! Ich will vier Euro!

Ihr müsst feilschen!

Wieviel will sie? — Sie will vier, und den hässlichen schwarzen Stein.

Ich gebe dir nur drei Euro, nicht mehr. — Nein, mein schöner weißer Stein kostet vier Euro! — Ok, ich gebe dir vier Euro und den hässlichen schwarzen Stein. — Guter Tausch!

Was hast du? — Jetzt habe ich nur noch einen schönen weißen Stein, sonst nichts.

Was hast du sonst noch? — Sonst habe ich nichts.

Was ist passiert? — Du hast deinen hässlichen schwarzen Stein mit meinem alten bunten Stift getauscht und du hast noch zwei Euro gezahlt.

Du fragst sie.

Was ist dann passiert? — Du hast einen hässlichen schwarzen Stein und vier Euro mit meinem schönen weißen Stein getauscht.

Ja, kann man sagen.

Schenkst du mir deinen schönen weißen Stein? — Ja, ich schenke dir meinen schönen weißen Stein. — Danke, danke :)

Was willst du? — Ich will deinen schönen weißen Stein mit meinem hässlichen schwarzen Stein tauschen. — Nein, ich will nicht. Ich will deinen hässlichen schwarzen Stein nicht. — Warum nicht? — Weil er hässlich ist! :) Ich will sechs Euro für meinen schönen weißen Stein.

M gets very confused with this, I’m not sure if I overloaded her, or if she was just a bit full because of something else. However, when asking her if she’s full, she vehemently denies it.

V: I was confused. — Ich war verwirrt.

Was antwortest du? — Ich gebe dir meine sechs Euro für deinen schönen weißen Stein.

V: Für deinem? — Für deinen; mit deinem :P

Was hast du? — Ich habe nichts.

Liste: Nein, nicht, kein, nichts, niemand.

Wer hat einen schwarzen Stift? — Niemand hat einen schwarzen Stift.

Wer will essen? — Niemand will essen.

Short pause. We’re talking about when I’m leaving Cologne.

Ende Oktober, 31. glaube ich.

Bist du aufgeregt? — Ein bisschen.

Willst du fliegen? — Ich habe keine Angst vorm fliegen.

Willst du nach Hong Kong gehen? — Ich will mit der Bahn fahren, aber ich kann nicht.

M. comes back with a new bowl of chocolate olives.

Für wen ist das? — Für alle! — Ich esse nichts mehr. — Zwei für mich bitte!

V. finds out that she had already taken three chocolate olives.

Ich habe drei, und ich habe es vergessen!

Finding out that you can say “Ich habe es vergessen“, where “es” is mostly just a grammatical placeholder, or “Ich habe sie vergessen“, where “sie” refers to the olives, or “Ich habe ihn vergessen” when referring to coffee. Confusing! :)

V: You want water? (I’m acting like I don’t understand) Ah, willst du Wasser? — Nein danke, ich habe Tee. — Er will kein Wasser.

Willst du fünf Oliven? — Nein, ich will keine Oliven. Ich habe schon Oliven.

Du hast mir deinen schönen weißen Stein geschenkt. Darum gebe ich dir jetzt drei Euro.

Weil du mir deinen Stein geschenkt hast, gebe ich dir jetzt drei Euro.

Ich glaube, ich verstehe es.

Was hat sie mir geschenkt? — Sie hat dir ihren schönen weißen Stein geschenkt.

Liste: früher, jetzt, später.

Liste: ich hatte, ich habe, ich werde haben. (Limit!)

Was habe ich darum gemacht? — Du hast ihr darum drei Euro gegeben.

I have three Euros on the table.

Ich habe einen Euro. — Ich glaube dir nicht. Das ist falsch!

Wie alt bist du? — Ich bin fünf Jahre alt! — Ich glaube ich dir nicht!

Gutes neues Spiel, gleich!

Ich glaube, dass du älter bist!

V: Ich glaube, morgen regnet es. — Glaubst du auch, dass es morgen regnet? — Ja, ich glaube auch, dass es morgen regnet.

V: and snow? — Was ist “snow”?? Erkläre mir “snow” auf Deutsch :)

V: weiss, Wasser, …

Liste: kalt, warm, heiß.

Wenn es warm ist, dann regnet es. Wenn es sehr kalt ist, dann schneit es.

M. still insists on having an explanation for “es”… I ask her what the “Oli” in “Olive” means, trying to make her understand that the word does not make sense on its own.

Warum schneit es? Weil es kalt ist. Darum schneit es.

Liste: vergessen, erinnern, verstehen, glauben.

Wieviel Geld hast du? — (She has no money) Ich habe fünf Euro. — Ich glaube dir nicht. Ich glaube nicht, dass du fünf Euro hast. Ich glaube, dass du nichts hast.

Wieviel Steine hast du? — (She has two rocks) Ich habe drei Steine. — Ich glaube dir nicht. Ich glaube nicht, dass du drei Steine hast. Ich glaube, dass du nur zwei Steine hast.

Wieviel Euro hast du? — Ich habe einen Euro. — Ich glaube dir nicht. Ich glaube, dass du mehr Euros hast. — Wieviele Euro habe ich? — Ich glaube, du hast sechs Euro. — Hm, stimmt. Du hast recht! (using the sign for “genau!”, but with “R” hands)

Liste: links, mitte, rechts. (not sure that’s a good idea, might even help to confuse between “rechts” and “recht”)

Liste: auf, unter, vor, hinter, …

Welcher Schrank ist der höchste, der linke, der mittlere, oder der rechte? — Der mittlere Schrank is der höchste.

Liste: hoch, höher, am höchsten.

Liste: niedrig, niedriger, am niedrigsten.

Welcher Schrank is am niedrigsten, der linke, der mittlere, oder der rechte? — Der linke Schrank ist am niedrigsten.

Welcher Schrank ist mittelhoch, der linke, der mittlere, oder der rechte? — Der rechte Schrank ist mittelhoch.

Der rechte Schrank ist größer als der linke Schrank, aber kleiner als der mittlere Schrank.

Wie alt bist du? — Ich bin zwanzig Jahre alt. — Glaubst du ihr? — Nein, ich glaube ihr nicht. — Bin ich jünger oder älter? — Ich glaube du bist älter.

Ich bin zwei Jahre alt. — Ich glaube dir nicht. — Warum? — Weil du älter bist. Weil du aufs Gymnasium gehst, musst du älter sein. — Sehr schlau!

Liste: dumm, schlau.

M: Ich glaube du bist ein Hund! — Ich glaube, ich bin kein Hund. — Warum nicht? — Weil ich sprechen kann. Ein Hund kann nicht sprechen. — Kann Paul (our cat) sprechen? — Nein, Paul kann auch nicht sprechen. — Kann eine Maus sprechen? — Nein, eine Maus kann auch nicht sprechen.

Liste: Maus, Katze, Hund.

Ich glaube, dass ein Hund sprechen kann. Ich glaube das! Glaubst du das auch? — Nein, ich glaube das nicht. — Schade! — Glaubst du das wirklich? — Nein, ich glaube das nicht wirklich. Nur Spaß! Aber Elefanten können wirklich sprechen! — Menschlich sprechen? — Nein, anders. Nicht wie Menschen.

M: Ich gebe dir zwei Oliven. — Ich esse noch eine.

Liste: die erste, die nächste, die letzte.

V: Die letzte Olive ist für dich!

Wer hat die erste Olive gegessen? — Du hast die erste Olive gegessen.

Wer isst die letzte Olive? — Du isst auch die letzte Olive.

Four pens on the table, in a row: blue, black, black, red.

Wieviele Stifte sind auf dem Tisch? — Auf dem Tisch sind vier Stifte.

Ich nehme den blauen Stift. Was ist passiert? — Du hast den blauen Stift genommen. Du hast den ersten Stift genommen.

Nimm bitte den zweiten Stift. — Ich nehme den ersten schwarzen Stift.

Der zweite Stift, aber der erste schwarze Stift.

Was ist passiert? — Sie hat den ersten schwarzen Stift genommen.

Bitte nimm den zweiten schwarzen Stift. — Ich nehme den zweiten schwarzen Stift.

Was ist passiert? — Ich habe den zweiten schwarzen Stift genommen.

Der letzte Stift bleibt auf dem Tisch. Niemand nimmt ihn. Niemand hat ihn genommen, und niemand wird ihn nehmen. Er bleibt liegen.

Liste: gehen, stehen, sitzen, liegen.

Der letzte Stift bleibt liegen. Niemand nimmt ihn.

Wer hat den ersten Stift genommen? — Du hast den ersten Stift genommen.

Welche Farbe hat der erste Stift? — Der erste Stift ist blau.

Wer hat den zweiten Stift genommen? — Sie hat den zweiten Stift genommen.

Welche Farbe hat der zweite Stift? — Der zweite Stift ist schwarz. etc.

Wer hat den letzten Stift genommen? — Niemand hat den letzten Stift genommen. Der letzte Stift ist auf dem Tisch geblieben.

Beispiel: Wir gehen ins Kino! — Nein, ich bleibe hier. Ich schlafe.

M: Kann ich Griechisch sprechen? — Nein, du darfst nicht! Verboten! — Warum? — Darum! :)

That’s what parents say in Germany when children always ask “Warum??”

Welche Farbe hat der letzte Stift? — Der letzte Stift ist rot.

Ist der letzte Stift blau? — Nein, der letzte Stift ist nicht blau, der letzte Stift ist rot. Der erste Stift ist blau.

M. seems tired.

V: Bist du voll, oder willst du mehr spielen?

S: Willst du Pause machen, oder mehr spielen? Stop, oder weitermachen?

Ist der zweite Stift rot? — Nein, der zweite Stift ist nicht rot, der zweite Stift ist schwarz. Der letzte Stift ist rot.

At this point, I’m just using very few signs to trigger what they should say, like “letzte”, “nicht”; and I use explicit signs whenever somebody forgets a word.

Wo ist der bunte Stift? — Der bunte Stift ist nicht auf dem Tisch. Der bunte Stift ist im Sack. — Glaubst du?

Hier ist der bunte Stift. (I’m hiding the pen behind my back in one of my hands) In welcher Hand ist der bunte Stift, in der linken Hand oder in der rechten Hand?

Unfortunately, “Hand” is female, so the grammar is a bit confusing here.

Ich glaube, der bunte Stift ist in der linken Hand. — Ich glaube, der bunte Stift ist in der rechten Hand. — Wer hat recht, du oder sie?

Wer hat recht gehabt? — Ich habe recht gehabt. Du hast nicht recht gehabt.

Liste: falsch, richtig.

Liste: ich will, ich habe, ich gebe, ich nehme, ich verstecke, ich klaue, ich kaufe, ich schenke.

Ich verstecke jetzt wieder den bunten Stift. — Du versteckst wieder den bunten Stift.

Wo glaubst du ist der Stift? — Ich glaube, der Stift ist in der rechten Hand. — Ich glaube, der Stift ist in der linken Hand.

Wer hat recht gehabt, du oder sie? — Sie hat recht gehabt. Ich habe nicht recht gehabt.

Pech gehabt! Glück gehabt!

Pech ist das Gegenteil von Glück.

Wer hat Glück gehabt? — Sie hat Glück gehabt. Ich habe kein Glück gehabt. Ich habe Pech gehabt. (TQ Prove it!)

Wie lange haben wir gespielt? — Wir haben mehr als zwei Stunden lang gespielt.

(Set-up: I get three pens, and give V one pen) Ich habe mehr als zwei Stifte. Wer hat mehr als zwei Stifte? — Du hast mehr als zwei Stifte.

Wer hat weniger als zwei Stifte? — Ich habe weniger als zwei Stifte. Sie hat auch weniger als zwei Stifte. — Wieviele Stifte hat sie? — Sie hat keine Stifte.

Wer hat mehr als drei Stifte? — Niemand hat mehr als drei Stifte. — Du hast drei Stifte. — Ich habe genau drei Stifte.

Liste: leicht, schwer.

Was war leicht für dich? — “Rechts, links” war leicht für mich.

Was war schwer für dich? — “Darum” war schwer für mich.

Bist du müde? — Nein, ich bin nicht müde, ich bin erschöpft.

V: Wenn du zehn Stunden arbeitest, dann bist du erschöpft.

Am nächsten Montag ist wieder Schule.

Montag und Mittwoch habe ich um sechs Uhr VHS.

Wir spielen wieder morgen um zwei Uhr.

Das war’s.

Wie spät ist es? — Es ist zwanzig vor fünf.

Es ist fast zwanzig vor fünf. Wann ist es zwanzig vor fünf? — In zwei Minuten.